Driving Drowsy is Illegal in Ohio

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Ohio Revised Code 4511.79 makes is a minor misdemeanor for a someone to drive “a commercial motor vehicle”  “while the person’s ability or alertness is so impaired by fatigue, illness, or other causes that it is unsafe for the person to drive such vehicle.”  The law also provides that, “[n]o driver shall use any drug which would adversely affect the driver’s ability or alertness.”

Furthermore, O.R.C. 4511.79(B) prohibits an owner from “knowingly” permitting a driver in any such condition to drive.  Repeated violations result in enhancement of the charge from a minor misdemeanor to a fourth degree misdemeanor.

The National Highway Transportation Administration has conducted extensive study of drowsy driving in, Drowsy Driving and Automobile Crashes [linked].  Although no driver is immune, the following three population groups are at highest risk, based on evidence from crash reports and self-reports of sleep behavior and driving performance.

  • Young people (ages 16 to 29), especially males.
  • Shift workers whose sleep is disrupted by working at night or working long or irregular hours.
  • People with untreated sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) and narcolepsy.

Charles M. Rowland II has represented commercial drivers/truck drivers for over fifteen years and understands the issues involved in drowsy driving cases.  Often these types of cases involve serious crashes or the possibility of loss of a driver’s career.  If you are in need of an attorney who can help you save your CDL (commercial driver’s license), contact Charles M. Rowland II today at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263), (937) 318-1DUI (318-1384) or visit www.DaytonDUI.com.

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