Ohio BMV Issues

Ohio BMV License Suspension

March 20th, 2014

BMV License SuspensionThe most common reasons that a person will have a driver’s license suspension by the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles include:

  • Accumulating 12 “points” for traffic violations
  • Driving Without Insurance
  • Operating a Vehicle Impaired (testing over .08 or refusing to test)
  • Drug Offenses
  • Out-of-State DUI/OVI or drug related offenses

If you would like an unofficial copy of your driving record or more information on your type of license suspension or reinstatement, you can visit the BMV web site by clicking HERE.

You should not ignore a notice of suspension because it does not go away unless and until you pay the required reinstatement fees to the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. You can appeal your BMV suspension by filing a proper petition with your local municipal court which is also empowered to give you driving privileges during the pendency of your license suspension.   The only exception exists if your license is suspended due to a failure to pay child support.  In such cases, petitions for driving privileges will be handled by the county’s Domestic Relations/Family Court.  Once you submit the appropriate paperwork and pay your filing fee, your appeal will be assigned to a Judge. At this time, you can also present a driving permit to the Court for consideration by a Judge. You can request driving privileges for work, educational or medical reasons.

The court will also allow you t set up a payment plan should you not be able to pay off your reinstatement fee in a lump sum.  The Ohio BMV will offer a driver’s license reinstatement fee installment plan to those individuals who have met all their reinstatement requirements except for paying reinstatement fees. The plan will allow individuals owing $150 or more in reinstatement fee to become valid or eligible to retest for a driver license by paying only $50.00 or more every 30 days for as long as it takes to pay their reinstatement fees.

The license suspension appeal process can vary from court to court.  It is often a very good investment to have an Ohio traffic attorney help you through this process.  The attorney will be familiar with the court’s appeal process and the required paperwork.  You should be able to get guidance as to how to get the maximum number of hours allowed by the court.  Often, people will need to address travel needs or have to deal with a work schedule that changes every week.  Again, a good attorney can deal with these issues.  They can also help avoid trouble by filing and re-filing should your circumstances change. It is also important to consider that driving without a valid permit could result in a criminal charge of Driving Under Suspension, a first degree misdemeanor punishable by a $1,000 fine and the possibility of 180 days in jail.

OVI Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio and protecting you.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can emailCharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

Ohio BMV license suspension information and other city-specific info at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

Is This The End of Drunk Driving Arrests?

March 4th, 2014

drunk driving arrests

Will there still be drunk driving arrests in the future?  This is the question raised by Money Watch and CBS in the article about autonomous cars, “Will Your Car Be Driving Itself By 2020?”  According to the article,  ”[i]t all sounds like science fiction: cars that drive themselves, navigate streets and avoid crashes. But last week Nissan said it would have such “autonomous cars” to sell by 2020. And General Motors chimed in that it may have a similar model by then.”  The government is not as convinced. ”The car–no matter how automated–is not yet ready to be more than a co-pilot,” said National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator David Strickland in a statement.  There are also significant consumer issues.  ”A recent Kelley Blue Book poll found 53 percent of respondents said they would never buy a self-driving car while only 18 percent said they would consider one now if it were available. Twenty percent said they might consider buying if the technology improved in five to 10 years.”

 The implications of these changes could be enormous for attorneys.  If cars can be truly autonomous in the next ten to twenty years will that mean the end of personal injury attorneys? Will it spell the end of drunk driving arrests? It also raises practical concerns over MADD’s legislative agenda.  MADD has been working with major insurance companies and automobile manufacturers to get a passive alcohol system (called DADDS) as mandated equipment in every automobile in the world.  In 2008, at MADD’s urging, the Automotive Coalition for Traffic Safety entered into a $10 million agreement with the federal government to develop such a technology. This system would  search every driver (not just convicted DUI offenders) every single time they started their car.  This year, MADD’s power as one of the nation’s leading lobbying groups resulted in a provision in the Senate transportation bill to ““more widespread deployment of in-vehicle technology” that would prevent drunken driving.  The research will be carried out by the Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety, a collaboration between NHTSA and the automobile industry.  It will be interesting to see if MADD is looking for a solution or more drunk driving arrests.

If you think the self-driving car is a pipe dream consider this: Nevada, Florida and California have passed laws allowing self-driving cars on their roads for testing with certain safeguards.  The 2014 Mercedes-Benz S class can brake and steer itself for a few seconds under certain conditions. Mercedes, BMW, Lexus and some other luxury brands have implemented automated cruise control that keeps your car a safe distance behind the one ahead and if the radar system senses an imminent crash, puts on the brakes.  The tech giant Google has also put resources behind developing the technology. Analysts believe Google, if successful, would try to sell the system to the auto industry rather than build cars itself.

 

Dayton DUI attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

Find information on drunk driving arrests and other city-specific info at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

 

Will I Be Required To Use Restricted Plates (A.K.A Party Plates)?

October 2nd, 2013

restricted platesWhen will you be required to use restricted plates?

If you thought that public shaming was a barbaric practice relegated to the distant past, you have not been driving through Ohio.  Ohio was the first state in the country to adopt a form of public humiliation by adopting special license plates (called restricted plates) for drunk driving offenders.  Use of the “scarlet letter” restricted plates became mandatory in 2004. O.R.C. 4507.02(F)(2) and 4503.231.  These bright yellow restricted plates with prominent red lettering (often referred to as “party plates”) are an indelible record of your offense and will not be easily forgotten by friends, family, customers and clients.  At DaytonDUI we are opposed to “branding,” “shaming,” and/or “humiliation” as a method of punishment and will fight to keep these abominations off your vehicle.

When are yellow DUI plates required?  If you are convicted of OVI in Ohio, yellow “restricted plates” are required in certain circumstances.

  • If you are convicted of OVI as a first offense, the judge has discretion to order restricted plates as a condition of granting you limited driving privileges.
  • If you are placed under and administrative license suspension, a judge has discretion to order restricted plates as a condition of granting limited driving privileges.
  • If you are convicted of O.V.I. as a first offense that involves a “high test”, the judge must order restricted plates as a condition of limited driving privileges.
  • If you are convicted of OVI as a second offense or more within six years, the judge must order restricted plates as a condition of limited driving privileges.
  • If you are convicted of O.V.I. as a fourth offense or more within 20 years, the judge must order restricted plates as a condition of limited driving privileges.

In addition to the problems of living with the plates is the inconvenience of obtaining the plates.  If you are required to use these plates, you must surrender your plates to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles who, in turn, will give you the restricted plates.  The restricted plates must remain on your vehicle for the duration of any license suspension imposed by the court and/or during the duration of the administrative license suspension.

OVI Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can emailCharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

 Find OVI  or restricted plates information and other city-specific info at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville 

Ohio OVI Law: The Habitual Offender Registry

August 6th, 2013

morguefile free beer can topOhio OVI law states that you  can’t be a chronic alcoholic and drive in Ohio.  Ohio driver’s license laws forbid the issuance of a driver’s license to, or the retention of a license by, a person who is “alcoholic, or is addicted to the use of controlled substances to the extent that the use constitutes an impairment to the person’s ability to operate a motor vehicle with the required degree of safety” (Ohio R.C. 4507.08(D)(1).  Such persons will be placed on Ohio’s Habitual Offender Registry.

If you have an OVI conviction after September 30, 2008 and you have four or more prior OVI (or equivalent) convictions in the past 20 years, you will be placed on the Ohio Habitual Offender Registry.  The Registry includes the name, address, and date of birth of offenders as well as their date of convictions.  The Registry is accessible to the public.  Offenders remain on the Registry until they no longer have five or more offenses within the past 20 years.  Such easily accessible information raises significant privacy concerns.  Ohio is one of very few states that have created such a registry.

If you are placed on the “Habitual Offender Suspension” registry, you will need to take specific steps to be removed.  The Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles will monitor your progress by ensuring that the Habitual Offenders completes a treatment / rehabilitation program after the date of the last Ohio OVI conviction.  To be removed from the registry, you must complete the following steps:

1. BMV Form 2326 must be completed by a license physician, licensed psychologist, or a certified alcoholism counselor.  The form must attest that you have completed treatment successfully.

 

2. This person must vouch for the offender’s successful completion of the rehabilitation program and continous sobriety for at least 6 months AFTER completing the program.  

 

3. BMV Form 2326 must be returned to the Ohio BMV within 90 days of it being completed.

 

4. Once this form is completed and submitted, the Special Case / Medical Unit will review all the information and make a decision about lifting the Habitual Offender Suspension.

 

5. If, however, within 1 year from the date of restoration the offender gets convicted of another DUI (or “equivalent offense” the suspension will be reinstated.

 

The following offenses constitute “equivalent offenses” for purposes of the statute: Physical Control Offenses(O.R.C. 4511.194); Misdemeanor OVI convictions (both test and refusal cases); Boating Under the Influence; OVUAC(underage/juvenile OVI); DUID (driving under the influence of drugs); OVI while operating under a Commercial Driver’s LicenseVehicular Assaults(including aggravated vehicular assaults); Vehicular manslaughterInvoluntary manslaughter with alcohol; Vehicular homicide (including aggravated vehicular homicide);

If you face placement on Ohio’s Habitual Offender Registry, please CONTACT Dayton Ohio DUI lawyer Charles M. Rowland II at 937-318-1DUI (318-1384), 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263), or text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500. www.DaytonDUI.com has proudly served Dayton and the Miami Valley since 1995.  He has been featured in both Time Magazine and Car & Driver Magazine for his leading role in DUI Defense. “ALL I DO IS DUI DEFENSE

DUI & The International Driver’s License

July 25th, 2013

IDCECardforSiteIn Ohio, there is no such thing as an international driver’s license for United States citizens.  If you are using an “international driver’s license” in place of a state-issued license, you should stop immediately. It is illegal, and if caught, you will face criminal charges.  If your Ohio State driver’s license has been revoked due to a DUI (now called OVI)you cannot drive here on any other license. If you have a valid license from somewhere else, you may be able to drive in other jurisdictions. Check with local counsel.

If, however, you are a new arrival to the United States you may use a valid license from your home country for up to one year from the date of your arrival in the U.S. Your I-20 or DS-2019 must have been issued for a duration of time that exceeds one year in order to obtain an Ohio Drivers License. (source)  Be sure that your home country has reciprocal driving privileges with the United States before attempting to drive on your home country driver’s license in Ohio.  You can contact the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles at (614) 752-7500.

An international driver’s license, which is not a valid document, should not be confused with an International Driving Permit (IDP), which functions as an official translation of a U.S. driver’s license into 10 foreign languages.  IDPs are not intended to replace valid U.S. state licenses and should only be used as a supplement to a valid license. An IDP is honored in more than 150 countries outside the U.S., but it must be accompanied by a valid driver’s license at all times. It has no value on its own and is not a substitute for a driver’s license.  Valid IDPs can be purchased only from the American Automobile Association (AAA) and the National Automobile Club (NAC), formerly the American Automobile Touring Alliance. These organizations are allowed only to sell permits to drivers older than 18 who possess valid drivers’ licenses issued by a U.S. state or territory. AAA and the NAC charge $15 for each International Driving Permit.

More detailed information about getting an Ohio driver’s license and license plates can be found in the Digest of Ohio Motor Vehicle Laws. (also available in Español and Somali). You can also find information for new Ohio residents who hold a valid driver’s license from another state and want to get an Ohio driver’s license in the Digest.

Contact Charles Rowland by phone at 937-318-1DUI (937-318-1384), 937-879-9542, or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (1-888-769-5263).  For after-hours help contact our 24/7 DUI HOTLINE at 937-776-2671.  Immediate help is available by filling out this CONTACT form.  For information about Dayton DUI sent directly to your mobile device, text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/DaytonDUI or Get Twitter updates via SMS by texting follow DaytonDUI to 40404. DaytonDUI is also available on Facebook and you can access updates by becoming a fan of Dayton DUI/OVI Defense.  You can also email Charles Rowland at: CharlesRowland@CharlesRowland.com or write to us at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.