Category Archives: DUI Case Law

Keeping you informed of changes in the law that impacts upon OVI practice in Ohio.

Ignition Interlock Bill Is Reintroduced

"Annie's Law" a bill that would require ignition interlocks for all first-time OVI (drunk driving) offenders is being reintroduced in the Ohio House. State Rep. Gary Scherer's new bill focuses on improving monitoring of ignition interlock devices and provides incentives for first-time offenders choosing to use an interlock device. There also are provisions to require notification when a…
Read more

Appreciable Impairment Offenses – You Look Drunk!

Appreciable Impairment Offenses:  If you refuse to take a chemical test, the State might still be able to prove you guilty of an OVI if they prove (beyond a reasonable doubt) that you  operated a motor vehicle after having consumed some alcohol, drugs of abuse, or a combination of the two and their ability to…
Read more

Are DUI Laws A Sophisticated Form Of Gaslighting?

How does "gaslighting" relate to Ohio DUI laws? In the 1944 film Gaslight, Ingrid Bergman's character  Paula Alquist Anton meets and marries the charming Gregory Anton played by Charles Boyer.  The husband does everything in his power to isolate his wife from other people. He allows her neither to go out nor to have visitors,…
Read more

Lawyer Up! Use Your Right To Remain Silent

We frequently encounter jurisdictions that conduct “interviews” with a suspect following an arrest.  These interviews are carefully crafted checklists that gather incriminating statements related to the elements of the crime and further attempt to limit mitigating factors which your attorney may later wish to assert.  You have the right to remain silent – use it!…
Read more

DUI Expungements Still Not A Reality In Ohio

Ohio Senate Bill 143 (OH SB143) was passed in the Senate June 4, 2014, and signed by Gov. John Kasich June, 2014. The new expungement law shall become effective September 19, 2014.  This follows the 2012 change to Ohio's expungement law (Ohio Senate Bill 337) which changed the requirement of “first offender” to “eligible offender,”…
Read more