Tag Archives: dayton dui attorney

Dayton DUI attorney Charles Rowland. All I do is DUI.

OVI Trial Practice: Admission of the Alcohol Influence Report

alcohol influence report

The Alcohol Influence Report is a document prepared by the arresting officer noting each and every indicator for alcohol impairment that they took note of in their investigation.  Most of the forms require that the officer simply check the predetermined indicator.  Not surprisingly, all the officer’s observations fall neatly into these predetermined areas. The report is a document of the officers opinions and should not be considered routine ministerial reports of a non-adversarial nature.   Clearly, letting the jury have this document as evidence to review in the jury room would be prejudicial to an OVI defense.

Evidence Rule 803(8) excludes the alcohol influence report from evidence.  It states, in pertinent part:

RULES OF EVIDENCE

(8) Public records and reports. Records, reports, statements, or data compilations, in any form, of public offices or agencies, setting forth (a) the activities of the office or agency, or (b) matters observed pursuant to duty imposed by law as to which matters there was a duty to report, excluding, however, in criminal cases matters observed by police officers and other law enforcement personnel, unless offered by defendant, unless the sources of information or other circumstances indicate lack of trustworthiness.

Some courts have found that admissions of the forms is reversible error. State v. Joyce, 1998 WL 315913 (Ohio Ct. App. 1st Dist. Hamilton County 1998); State v. Weaver, 1985 WL 4343 (Ohio Ct. App. 10th Dist. Franklin County 1985); State v. Nightwine, 1982 WL 6042 (Ohio Ct. App. 12th Dist. Preble County 1982).  See also Ohio DUI Law, Weiler & Weiler  2013-2014 ed. at 439.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

To learn more about the alcohol influence report check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburg, Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville, Alcohol Influence Report 

Big Weekend For Craft Beer In Ohio

beer in ohioIf you want to know anything about beer in Ohio, you have to check out the Beer Blog written by Rick Armon.  The Beer Blog chronicles anything and everything beer in and around Ohio.  This week he has chronicled all of the cool craft beer festivals that will take place this weekend.

Here’s the beer in Ohio rundown:

• The Craft Brew at the Zoo runs from 6 to 11 p.m. Saturday at the Columbus Zoo & Aquarium in Powell. There’s also a VIP session starting at 5 p.m. but that’s sold out. The event offers more than 50 craft beers, food and live music by J.T. Hillier, Drake White and the Big Fire Band, and Keith Anderson. Tickets are $30 and include a 10-ounce tasting glass and six 4-ounce samples. For more details, click here.

• The Grandview Craft Beer Alliance’s Summer Session runs from 3 to 7 p.m. Saturday in the park at the southeast corner of Grandview and Goodale in Grandview Heights. The festival will focus on beers containing 5 percent alcohol by volume and less from 16 Ohio breweries. There also will be food trucks and live music.
Tickets are $25. For more details, click here.

• The 16th annual AleFest Dayton takes place from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday at Wegerzyn Gardens. A VIP session gets you in an hour earlier. The event features more than 400 beers and ciders. Tickets are $35 for general admission and $50 for VIP. They include a commemorative tasting glass and 20 sampling tickets. For more details, click here.

• The inaugural Waterfront District Brewfest runs from noon to 6 p.m. Saturday in downtown Lorain. The event features all Ohio breweries. Tickets are $25 and include a souvenir glass and 15 4-ounce samples. For more details, click here.

• The eighth annual Cincy Brew Ha-Ha runs from 5 p.m. to midnight Thursday, 5 to midnight Friday and 4 p.m. to midnight Saturday at Sawyer Point Park in Cincinnati. The festival combines beer and comedy. For full details, click here.

But wait, that’s not all.

The Moerlein Lager House in Cincinnati is holding “Hop Heaven” all day Saturday. They are offering a ton of hoppy draft and bottled and canned beer throughout the day.

And the Firehouse Grill in Blue Ash will hold the finals for its Battle of the Beers competition starting at noon Sunday. The brewery that sells the most beers wins the Firehouse Cup. For more details, click here. To read a rundown of the event by Queen City Fresh, click here.

We always encourage you to have a great time and drink some great craft beer around Ohio this weekend, but be responsible and designate a sober driver.  The weekend festivities coincide with “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over,” a major law enforcement initiative targeting impaired motorists.  You can bet that law enforcement will be aware of these great beer in Ohio events. If you need an attorney, give us a call.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has no tattoo, but the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

Have fun at all of the great Beer in Ohio events and check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgHuber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

A Motion To Suppress Is Vital In An Ohio DUI Case

motion to suppressIn State v. French, 72 Ohio St. 3d 446, 1995-Ohio-32, 646 N.E. 2d 887 (1995), the Ohio Supreme Court held that a pretrial motion to suppress is the only way to challenge the admissibility of a chemical test.  If not filed, the results will be automatically admissible at trial.  The prosecuting attorney will not need to lay a foundation and any objection by the defense as to their admission will be overruled by the judge.  This makes choosing an experienced DUI attorney vital to your case as they will know what to challenge in a pretrial suppression motion.

A motion to suppress is one of the most important tools in a DUI attorney’s arsenal. It’s purpose is to render “the state’s proof … so weak in its entirety that any reasonable possibility of effective prosecution has been destroyed.” State v. Davidson, 17 Ohio St.3d 132, 135, 477 N.E.2d 1141 (1985). If successful, a motion will likely end the case in favor of the defendant.

The motion is the defendant’s challenge to crucial aspects of the State’s case, which may include challenges to:

  • the reason for the initial police contact;
  • the reason for asking the defendant to exit the car;
  • the reason for administering the standardized field sobriety tests;
  • the administration of the field sobriety tests;
  • the 20 minute observation period before the chemical test;
  • the administration and time frame of the chemical test; and
  • the results of the chemical test.

Ancillary benefits of a motion to suppress include the ability to see and hear the officer testify about the arrest. The officer may be an exceptionally good or bad witness. The state may or may not choose to pursue certain aspects of the case based on the testimony. Further, the motion hearing may prove to be a valuable discovery tool. From a purely strategic standpoint, a motion to suppress demonstrates to the State that you are committed to your client’s position and will do whatever it takes to prevent a DUI conviction.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

For more information about a motion to suppress contact me, or check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburg, Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

The Dayton DUI Blog Gets Recognition

Dayton DUI BlogThis very Dayton DUI blog has received inclusion in the LawBlogs.net collection of prestigious legal blogs.  At LawBlogs.net they have collected blogs that deal with almost every conceivable area of law.  It is well organized and fully integrated so that you can follow it on Twitter, Facebook and G+.  Look for us listed as Ohio DUI | OVI Blog!

The founder, Matthias Klappenbach explains,

I would love to start building out this community of law blogs. Right now there’s barely anyone around. Visitors are coming through links from JuraBlogs.com or somehow find the site on Google. However I will keep adding features as I believe in the idea of aggregating the posts and building the “one-stop” to stay up to date. I would love to get some feedback on new features or new blogs and of course I will listed to critique as well.  Eventually my goal is to algorithmically curate the popular and trending legal posts and related articles from the main stream media. LawBlogs.net should be seen as a quick help to navigate through the vast amount of legal content published every day.

If you are interested in all things legal give it a try.  I am proud to be a member of this group of blogs and proud that our DUI blog content was deemed good enough to merit inclusion.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

To learn more about DUI or the Dayton DUI blog check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburg, Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

Vehicle Forfeiture: Where Does The Money Go?

vehicle forfeiture

Have you ever wondered where the money goes following a vehicle forfeiture?

Does your police agency have some really cool sports cars, tricked out SUVs or ruggedly expensive off-road vehicles?  Chances are they got it via Ohio’s vehicle forfeiture law.  Pursuant to R.C. 4503.234(C)(1), the agency that arrested a defendant has a virtual right of first refusal on any forfeited vehicle.  All they have to do is satisfy the lienholder or the innocent non-owners interest if they have protected their interest in the vehicle.

If law enforcement does not want the vehicle it will be sent to auction.  Prior to the sale the prosecuting attorney must give public notice of the proposed sale.  See R.C. 4503.234(C)(2).  At the public auction, the vehicle is sold to the highest bidder – cash only!  R.C. 4503.234(C)(2)  Interestingly, if the “blue book” value of the vehicle is under $2,000.00 the court is authorized to dispose of it in any manner it deems appropriate. R.C. 4503.234(G).

 

  • When the vehicle is sold the money goes to the following people:
  • to the costs associated the the seizure, storage, maintenance, security, and sale;
  • to the value of any non-owner interest established in the vehicle;
  • any remaining proceeds up to $1,000.00 to the law enforcement trust fund [R.C. 2933,43(D)(1)(c) and (2)];

 

Whatever proceeds are left after that go to the following people:

 

  • 50% to the reparation fund [R.C. 2743.191];
  • 25% to the Drug Abuse Resistance Education Fund [R.C. 4511.191(F)(2)(e)]; and
  • 25% to the law enforcement trust fund [R.C. 2981.13]

The law has two particularly ugly provision relating to passengers.  If you are a passenger in a vehicle and you knew or should have known that the driver was impaired you cannot get reparations for your injuries proximately caused by the driver.  See R.C. 2743.191 as amended by SB 153.   No compensation will be paid to a passenger under the influence who should have reasonably known, if that passenger would have been sober, that the driver was under the influence. R.C. 2743.06(B).

As you can see from the priority list above, the law enforcement agency benefits more when an expensive vehicle is forfeited.  Usually, we call this policing for profit when the property is targeted by police so that they can reap a benefit.  Unlike drug forfeitures, however, a vehicle forfeiture in an Ohio OVI case are caused by the actions of the accused driver not by motivated policing.

Much of the vehicle forfeiture information provided herein is set forth at Ohio DUI Law, Weiler & Weiler, 2013-2014 ed.

 

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

For information about vehicle forfeiture contact me, or check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburg, Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville