Tag: Driving under the influence

DUI on the Water and the Return of Boating Season

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Slalom skier

With the return of the summer boating season, many people will soon be enjoying Ohio’s beautiful lakes and rivers.  This is a reminder that Ohio is cracking down on captains who indulge in alcohol while on the water.  Boating Under the Influence is illegal in Ohio. 2001 Sub. S.B. 123, eff. 1-1-04 sought to unify the drunk driving provisions with Ohio’s boating laws.   O.R.C. 1547.11(A)(1)  to O.R.C. 1547.11(A)(6) prohibit a person from operating or being in physical control of a vessel underway or manipulating water skis, aquaplanes, or similar devices while under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

O.R.C. 1547.11(A)(1) is the impairment provision of the law, preventing operation or physical control while under the influence.  The law also has a provision preventing operation with a prohibited level of alcohol which it sets at the same prohibited level (.08) as the DUI/OVI law Unlike the DUI/OVI law, there are no high-tier provisions which apply to boating. A third section of the law prohibits operation or physical control with a concentration of certain controlled substances (marijuana, cocaine, amphetamine, et al.) or metabolites of the same.  This section of the law is identical to the DUI-drug provisions found in O.R.C. 4511.19(A)(1)(j).

Subsequent amendments to the law, 2007 Am. Sub. S.B. 17, eff. 9-30-08, allows for forced blood draws for persons with two or BUI offenses.  A BUI offense can be used to enhance a subsequent DUI/OVI  offense. O.R.C. 4511.181(A)(6)-(7).  Some important differences in Ohio’s BUI law, stem from the fact that Ohio does not require an operator’s license to operate a watercraft.  Therefore, no administrative license suspension provisions are in the law.  Instead, the chief of the Division of Watercraft gives written notice that you are prevented from operating or being in physical control of a watercraft (or from registering a watercraft) for one year from the date of the alleged violation.  Another key difference is that a fourth or subsequent BUI offense is not subject to felony enhancement.

Penalties for Boating Under the Influence offenses are set forth at O.R.C. 1547.99 and are similar to those provided for DUI/OVI offenses.  Boating Under the Influence is a first degree misdemeanor and is subject to a minimum 3-day jail sentence and a maximum 6 months in jail.  The 3-day jail sentence can be served in a qualified driver intervention program.  The minimum mandatory fine for a first BUI offense is $150.  A second offense within 6 years carries a mandatory 10 day jail sentence, but the minimum mandatory fine is still $150.  A third offense requires a minimum of 30 days in jail. NOTE: The Ohio legislature is constantly “tweaking” the Ohio DUI and BUI laws, so please check with an attorney as these laws may have changed.

Contact Charles Rowland by phone at 937-318-1DUI (937-318-1384), 937-879-9542, or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (1-888-769-5263). For after-hours help contact our 24/7 DUI HOTLINE at 937-776-2671.For information about Dayton DUI sent directly to your mobile device, text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/DaytonDUI or Get Twitter updates via SMS by texting follow DaytonDUI to 40404. DaytonDUI is also available on Facebook and you can access updates by becoming a fan of Dayton DUI/OVI Defense.  You can also email Charles Rowland at: CharlesRowland@CharlesRowland.com or write to us at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.

Happy Labor Day from Charles Rowland and DaytonDUI

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Happy Labor DayHappy Labor Day My father started out in the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen which became the United Transportation Union.  My Mom was a proud member of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME).   Without the good wages and benefits provided by their shared sacrifice, I could never have gone to college.  Charles M. Rowland II salutes America’s hard-working men and women and join in our shared hopes that all who seek work can find a meaningful way to build the American Dream.

Happy Labor Day!

Dayton DUI Wishes You a Happy Memorial Day Holiday

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“Poor is the country that has no heroes.  But beggared is the people who having them forgets.”

-Col. Wm. A. Jones III, Medal of Honor Recipient-

As you pause to remember those who have died in our nation’s service, have a safe and relaxing Memorial Day Weekend.  If you find yourself in need of representation resulting from a DUI arrest, contact Charles M. Rowland II at 937-318-1DUI (318-1384) or 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263).

Urine Testing: No Privacy For You!

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urine testingThe rules for urine testing in Ohio are set forth at Ohio Administrative Code 3701-53-05 & 3701-53-06.  At O.A.C. 3701-53-05, it is clearly stated that a urine test must be witnessed.  It states at subsection (D),

(D) The collection of a urine specimen must be witnessed to assure that the sample can be authenticated. Urine shall be deposited into a clean glass or plastic screw top container which shall be capped, or collected according to the laboratory protocol as written in the laboratory procedure manual.

In urine testing cases, the state has the burden to prove substantial compliance with the regulations upon a defendant’s motion to suppress results of urine-alcohol tests.  State v. Mayl, 106 Ohio St.3d 207, 2005-Ohio-4629, 833 N.E.2d 1216, paragraph one of the syllabus.  “The defendant must first challenge the validity of the alcohol test by way of a pretrial motion to suppress;  failure to file such a motion ‘waives the requirement on the state to lay a foundation for the admissibility of the test results.’  State v. French (1995), 72 Ohio St.3d 446, 451, 650 N.E.2d 887.   After a defendant challenges the validity of test results in a pretrial motion, the state has the burden to show that the test was administered in substantial compliance with the regulations prescribed by the Director of Health.   Once the state has satisfied this burden and created a presumption of admissibility, the burden then shifts to the defendant to rebut that presumption by demonstrating that he was prejudiced by anything less than strict compliance.  * * * Hence, evidence of prejudice is relevant only after the state demonstrates substantial compliance with the applicable regulation.”  (Emphasis added.)  Burnside, 100 Ohio St.3d 152, 2003-Ohio-5372, 797 N.E.2d 71, ¶ 24.

While Crim.R. 47 requires a defendant to state his grounds for a motion to suppress “with particularity,” the state waives this issue if it is not raised in opposition to a defendant’s motion to suppress.  State v. Mayl, 154 Ohio App.3d 717, 2003-Ohio-5097, 798 N.E.2d 1101, ¶ 22.

So the moral of the story is one that has been repeated on this page many times.  Communicate, communicate, communicate! Spend time telling your attorney about all aspects of a urine testing case, because what may seem like an insignificant or embarrassing detail, may help you win your case.  It is also important that you trust your case with an attorney who has the experience necessary to help you win your case.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  Email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

For more information on urine testing cases check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburg,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

OVI Trial Practice: Admission of the Alcohol Influence Report

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alcohol influence report

The Alcohol Influence Report is a document prepared by the arresting officer noting each and every indicator for alcohol impairment that they took note of in their investigation.  Most of the forms require that the officer simply check the predetermined indicator.  Not surprisingly, all the officer’s observations fall neatly into these predetermined areas. The report is a document of the officers opinions and should not be considered routine ministerial reports of a non-adversarial nature.   Clearly, letting the jury have this document as evidence to review in the jury room would be prejudicial to an OVI defense.

Evidence Rule 803(8) excludes the alcohol influence report from evidence.  It states, in pertinent part:

RULES OF EVIDENCE

(8) Public records and reports. Records, reports, statements, or data compilations, in any form, of public offices or agencies, setting forth (a) the activities of the office or agency, or (b) matters observed pursuant to duty imposed by law as to which matters there was a duty to report, excluding, however, in criminal cases matters observed by police officers and other law enforcement personnel, unless offered by defendant, unless the sources of information or other circumstances indicate lack of trustworthiness.

Some courts have found that admissions of the forms is reversible error. State v. Joyce, 1998 WL 315913 (Ohio Ct. App. 1st Dist. Hamilton County 1998); State v. Weaver, 1985 WL 4343 (Ohio Ct. App. 10th Dist. Franklin County 1985); State v. Nightwine, 1982 WL 6042 (Ohio Ct. App. 12th Dist. Preble County 1982).  See also Ohio DUI Law, Weiler & Weiler  2013-2014 ed. at 439.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

To learn more about the alcohol influence report check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburg, Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville, Alcohol Influence Report