Posts Tagged ‘facebook’

Prom DUI Blitz Underway

April 16th, 2014

prom dui 1957

Mothers Against Drunk Driving and their partners in law enforcement have begun the annual Prom DUI enforcement blitz that will last throughout the prom season.  So in addition to the tuxedos, the wrist corsages and the awkward pictures; make sure you talk to your teen about drunk driving.  MADD is proclaiming April 21 “PowerTalk21 Day” to encourage parents and teens to talk about alcohol.

In recent years, MADD has shifted its focus away from its singular mission of preventing drunk driving, to include an effort to curb underage drinking.  The Prom DUI enforcement is used in conjunction with their efforts at instilling fear amongst parents who may provide alcohol to minors in their home.  This initiative has been aided by a national ad campaign called “Parents Who Host Lose The Most.”  As prom season approaches you may be confronted with information about furnishing alcohol to minors and the penalties associated with such action.  Ohio Revised Code Section 4301.69 contains most of the information concerning underage alcohol possession and use. Penalties are in Ohio Revised Code Section 4301.99. These and other related laws can be found on the Internet: http://codes.ohio.gov/orc.

A person who furnishes alcohol to an underage person is guilty of a first-degree misdemeanor. The maximum penalty associated with this offense is six months imprisonment or $1,000 fine or both. A social host, therefore, risks being fined and imprisoned when he/she furnishes alcohol to a person who is not 21 years of age. Keep in mind that you don’t have to be in the house – if you are negligent in supervision or permissive you can be charged with social hosting.  If you purchase a hotel room, provide a campsite, or have people in your house or on your property you will be held responsible for what happens.

In addition to the penalties for furnishing alcohol to minors, you may also face a rioting charge if your party is deemed unruly or draws police attention. Rioting is defined as four or more persons engaged in disorderly conduct, and it is “aggravated” if those involved commit or act with the purpose to commit a felony or an act of violence. Aggravated Riot also includes situations where those involved are carrying weapons. Aggravated Riot is a felony, and Riot is a first-degree misdemeanor. Under a law passed in 2003, if you are convicted of rioting or aggravated rioting, you will be immediately expelled for one year from all state-supported colleges in Ohio, and will be ineligible for state financial aid for two years.

The best way to avoid a Prom DUI is to plan ahead and designate a sober driver or hire a limousine service for the night.

Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

Find more information on Prom DUI enforcement check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

 

Ignition Interlock Devices For Everyone – We Warned You!

March 10th, 2014

ignition interlockH.B. 469 (Annie’s Law) presented at the Ohio Statehouse on Thursday will require an ignition interlock device  be installed on the vehicle of all convicted drunk drivers, including first-time offenders.  Ohio law currently prescribes “blow to go” devices for repeat drunk driving offenders, but not on a first offense.  We have longed warned (previous story HERE) that this was at the top of MADD’s agenda and a continuation of their desire to impose penalties on a driver before they are found guilty of an offense.  Essentially, this law is an attack on a person’s presumption of innocence.  State Representatives Terry Johnson (R-McDermott) and Gary Scherer (R-Circleville) are the lead sponsors of House Bill 469.

Currently, interlock search devices are used in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. However, states vary widely in how the ignition interlock devices are used and which drivers are required to install them. In West Virginia, for example, interlock devices are only ordered at a judge’s discretion while Michigan mandates their use for drivers who are found with a BAC more than twice the state’s legal limit.  In Ohio, ignition interlock devices are required for any driver accused of a second OVI (drunk driving) offense and are otherwise discretionary to the judge.  NHTSA and MADD want to eliminate these discrepancies and urge the adoption of a model rule which covers first-time offenders with a BAC just over the legal limit and would require the installation of ignition-preventing interlock search devices on hundreds of thousands more vehicles.  Currently, only 20 states require the devices for anyone convicted of a drunken driving-related offense.

Some studies show that ignition-preventing interlock devices are about 75 percent effective in keeping those previously convicted of drunken driving from repeating their behavior. While there are numerous different designs, the typical ignition interlock requires the driver to blow into a tube that measures breath alcohol levels. If a person fails he or she may try again, for up to three attempts before the vehicle is locked down.  Other versions may also use cameras to record a person’s behavior behind the wheel. Courts may access the data recorded and, in some jurisdictions, a motorist who blew over the limit may face additional penalties.  Ignition Interlock devices typically cost about $150 and may run $80 a month or more to maintain.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

 Find information on Ignition Interlock devices on this blog, or check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

Happy Presidents Day From DaytonDUI

February 17th, 2014

presidents day

Happy Presidents Day from all of us at Babb & Rowland.

In honor of Presidents Day, we will be closed on Monday February 17, 2014.  You can still reach Charles Rowland at my 24/7 DUI Hot-line: (937) 776-2671.  Fill out our short contact form and I will return your call within 1 hour.  For information about Dayton DUI sent directly to your mobile device, text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  We offer a free text service on our blog which will keep you informed about traffic initiatives in and around the Miami Valley.  Videos about DaytonDUI are available at the DaytonDUI YouTube channel and audio clips answering frequently asked questions are available under the Audio heading of this blog.  Follow DaytonDUI on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/DaytonDUI or Get Twitter updates via SMS by texting follow DaytonDUI to 40404. DaytonDUI is also available on Facebook and you can access updates by becoming a fan of DaytonDUI.  Remember “All I do is DUI Defense.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “Happy Presidents Day.”

Presidents Day information and other city-specific info at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

The Dayton Municipal Court Traffic School Program

February 5th, 2014

Dayton Municipal CourtThe Dayton Municipal Court Traffic School Program enables approved defendants, who have voluntarily entered a Plea of Guilty to a minor misdemeanor traffic citation, issued within the jurisdiction of the Dayton Municipal Court, to have their cases dismissed and no points assessed to their driving records upon successful completion of the program and payment of the program fee.  The Traffic Safety Class fee is $250 and this fee is non-refundable.  The Traffic Safety Class is held at the Dayton Municipal Court on selected Thursdays from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

The Prosecutor’s Office will review each minor misdemeanor traffic case individually to determine eligibility for the Traffic Safety Program. The minimum criteria for participating in the Traffic Safety Program are:

  • A two-point minor misdemeanor traffic violation with no accompanying criminal charges;
  • The traffic case does not involve an accident or property damage;
  • The traffic violation is not a disqualifying offense for the holder of a commercial driver’s license;
  • The defendant has not participated in the Traffic Safety Program within the last 12 months; and
  • A valid driver’s license at the time of the plea.

For more information on the Dayton Municipal Court Traffic Safety Program please visit the website HERE or contact the program coordinator at (937) 333-4456 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EST Monday through Friday.

Dayton OVI Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio and protecting you.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can emailCharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

Dayton Municipal Court information and other city-specific info at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

What Is Community Control?

January 23rd, 2014

probation and community controlProbation is now called “community control” and provides for terms and conditions you must comply with in order not to go to jail.  Community control requires you to work with a “probation officer” (P.O.) for a given period of time as set by the court.  A common misconception is that the probation officer will actively work against you in an effort to return you to jail.  Most of the time, the probation officer is working to make sure you comply with the court order and stay out of jail.  It is up to you to show up and make sure the probation officer is kept aware of your circumstances.  You should maintain contact with your trial attorney as may problems can be solved if there is good communication.  Most experienced attorneys can advise you about how to navigate the courts probation department and successfully complete a term of community control. Under Ohio law, you cannot demand to serve jail time instead of being placed on community control in misdemeanor OVI cases, see State v. Walton (2000), 137 Ohio App. 3d 450, 457 — “…(A) misdemeanor offender has no right to refuse probation and to demand to serve her sentence of imprisonment.” Unlicensed driver was headed to prison for eight months and wanted six month traffic sentence served concurrently. Instead, the judge put her on probation.

Often, a court will only keep you on community control until you have paid all fines and costs and complied with the requirements of your punishments.  In Ohio OVI cases, the probation department is responsible for setting up the 72 hour Driver Intervention Program and will make sure you attend and complete the program.  Work with your Ohio OVI attorney to learn about how to comply with the terms and conditions of probation (now called “Community Control Sanctions”).  Depending on the court, you may face any or all of the following probationary conditions:

  • No new DUI or serious traffic arrests;
  • Alcohol Assessment and/or Follow Up Alcohol Counseling;
  • Random Urine Screens; Restrictions on driving times;
  • No “Refusals” of blood, breath, or urine tests if arrested for DUI;
  • No odor of alcohol while driving a vehicle;
  • Pay fines and court costs;
  • Attend MADD’s Victim Impact Panel;
  • Attend probation officer meetings;
  • Install Ignition Interlock (breath tester in the vehicle);
  • Continuous Alcohol Monitor (ankle bracelet);
  • Restrictions on travel outside of Ohio or the county;
  • Electronic Home Monitoring or House Arrest;
  • Work-Release or Community Service.

As you can see, the probation department and your probation officer have a great deal of power over your life while you are on community control.  Your DUI attorney should be a continued resource available to help you with issues that arise while on community control.  If you have been arrested for violating probation, you will have a hearing in front of  the judge. Since you have already been sentenced to probation for committing a crime, you will not be entitled to a jury to determine whether or not you have violated the terms of your probation.  The sentencing judge will hear the facts of your alleged violation, and determine if you did in fact violate any of the terms or conditions. A probation violation is not like a new criminal charge, you can be forced to testify against yourself and witness testimony can be used against you.  In most courts violations of the terms of your probation are very serious matters.  Unlike criminal matters, prosecutors are not bound by the “beyond a reasonable doubt standard.  Under Ohio law, prosecutors need only show that there exists a “preponderance of the evidence” that a violation has occurred, which means they only have to prove that it is more likely than not that you violated probation.  You should be aware of the terms and ask questions if you have any confusion.  A violation of technical terms (such as changing your address without informing the court, failing to pay on time and not showing up for your probation appointment) are as serious as the violation of a more substantive term.  Being charged with a new crime can result in a revocation of probation even if you are not convicted due to the lower preponderance of the evidence standard.  You could not only face jail time on the new charge, but face the time previously suspended from your earlier offense.  The charges need not be in the same court to invoke the court’s community control jurisdiction.

OVI Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio and protecting you.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can emailCharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.” law information and other city-specific info at the following links:

Community Control and other information can be found at these city-specific links

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville