Tag: ohio drug lawyer

Ohio OVI Enforcement Statistics Year-To-Date

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The Ohio State Highway Patrol has released year-to-date statistics on its Ohio OVI Enforcement.  2014 saw 2,100 arrests for OVI.  There was an increase in 2015 to 2,367 arrests.  Greene County saw arrests jump from 25 in 2014 to 47 this year. Montgomery County jumped from 58 arrests in 2014 to 72 this year. In Clark County the OSP arrested 26 people by this time in 2014 and 32 so far this year.

2015 looks like a bad year to forget to wear your seatbelt with a huge jump of 8,278 arrest vs 6,796 last year. Drug arrests are also significantly up again in 2015 with 1,275 arrested compared to 1,009 last year.  Interestingly the OSP seems to be doing fewer motorists assists. They have done 29,725 motorists assist so far in 2015 while having done 44,131 by this same point in 2014.

ohio ovi The great news from the statistics is that Ohio roadways continue to be very safe compared to any point in our history.  Fatal crashes have increased by only one over this point last year.  Keep up the good driving, always designate a sober driver, don’t text and drive and make Ohio a great place to live.

Ohio OVI attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio. He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671. You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500. Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio OVI blog. You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.

“All I do is DUI defense.”

For more info on Ohio OVI enforcement, check these city-specific sites at the following links:

Fairborn,Dayton,Springfield,Kettering,Vandalia,XeniaMiamisburg,Huber HeightsSpringboroOakwood,Beavercreek, Centerville

New Rules In Effect For Vicodin (Hydrocodone)

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Drug Schedules Changing For Some Vicodin – Hydrocodone Combos

vicodinIf you or someone you know takes hydrocodone, you need to know that brand new regulations went into effect Monday, which will change how you get the drug.  Hydrocodone/paracetamol, hydrocodone/acetaminophen, or hydrocodone/APAP (or under brand names such as Lortab, Norco or Vicodin) is a combination opioidnarcotic analgesic drug consisting of hydrocodone and paracetamol (acetaminophen) used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

The DEA rule switching”hydrocodone combination products” like Lortab and Vicodin from schedule III to schedule II  was passed to curb abuse and encourage patients and prescribers to consider alternative ways to deal with pain. Previously, these drugs were regulated as Schedule III drugs. drug schedule

Hydrocodone (Vicodin), and drugs that combine with hydrocodone, HPCs, are extremely popular. According to DHEC, nearly 137 million prescriptions for HPCs were dispensed in 2013.  Common hydrocodone combinations are used as pain relievers, cough suppressants and enhance the benefits of other drugs like acetaminophen or cough/cold medicines. We are familiar with the brand names like Vicodin, Lortab or Tussionex. As schedule III drugs, a prescriber could write up to 5 refills in a period of 6 months, and refills can be called in or faxed to the pharmacist.

Now that these medications are labeled as Drug Schedule II, a written prescription is required. No refills will be allowed so patients will be required to visit their doctor (and incur costs) to get a new prescription. Pharmacists will have special forms, protocols, and pharmacy storage regulations to initiate, as well. Schedule III drugs do not require a locked safe in the pharmacy.

Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio. He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671. You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500. Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog. You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.

“All I do is DUI defense.”

For more info on vicodin or Ohio drug laws, check these city-specific sites at the following links:

Fairborn, Dayton, Springfield, Kettering,Vandalia,XeniaMiamisburg,Huber HeightsSpringboroOakwood,Beavercreek, Centerville

Changes To Drug Schedule Affect Hydrocodone

00DUI, Drugs & Driving, Ohio Criminal LawTags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Drug Schedules Changing For Some Hydrocodone Combos

On October 6th the DEA rule switching”hydrocodone combination products” like Lortab and Vicodin from schedule III to schedule II came into effect.  The rule was passed to curb abuse and encourage patients and prescribers to consider alternative ways to deal with pain.  Previously, these drugs were regulated as Schedule III drugs. drug schedule

Common hydrocodone combinations are used as pain relievers, cough suppressants and enhance the benefits of other drugs like acetaminophen or cough/cold medicines.  We are familiar with the brand names like Vicodin, Lortab or Tussionex.  As schedule III drugs, a prescriber could write up to 5 refills in a period of 6 months, and refills can be called in or faxed to the pharmacist.

Now that these medications are labeled as  Drug Schedule II, a written prescription is required.  No refills will be allowed so patients will be required to visit their doctor (and incur costs) to get a new prescription. Pharmacists will have special forms, protocols, and pharmacy storage regulations to initiate, as well.  Schedule III drugs do not require a locked safe in the pharmacy.

Drug Schedule Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog

Email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

For more information on drug schedule issues check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXenia,  Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

For more on this topic, please check out this Drug Schedule Article at Drugs.com:

http://www.drugs.com/news/rescheduling-hydrocodone-combo-prescriptions-today-refills-become-more-difficult-53413.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=micro-blog&utm_campaign=DrugscomFB

Alcoholics Anonymous for Atheists?

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Alcoholics anonymousAlcoholics Anonymous for Atheists and Agnostics? Yes, that is a thing.

AA is open to people of all beliefs, but it is undoubtedly a spiritual program that asks people to have faith in certain principles. One of the most basic requirements of the program is that people believe in a higher power. The second step talks about how members came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity. While the third step describes how they made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him. There is also the expectation that members will have had a spiritual experience by the time they have completed the 12 Steps.  Many people who consider themselves Atheists or Agnostics find this off-putting and some are outright hostile to the program.

The question, “Can a Court order someone who is an atheist to attend AA?” made it all the way to the United States Supreme Court. Rejecting an appeal from officials in Orange County, N.Y., the U.S. Supreme Court has let stand a ruling protecting the right of an atheist to refuse mandatory attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous meetings as a condition for probation.  Important in the court’s decision was the finding that ran counter to a standard government claim often made in connection with faith-based social programs. Justice Leval:

The County argues further that the nonsectarian nature of the A.A. experience immunizes its use of religious symbolism and practices from Establishment Clause scrutiny. The argument is at the very least factually misleading, for the evidence showed that every meeting included at least one explicitly Christian Prayer. Furthermore, the claim that nonsectarian religious exercise falls outside the First Amendment’s scrutiny has been repeatedly rejected by the Supreme Court.

Well, it turns out that a group in Kettering is attempting to square that circle.  A new “AA” program for Atheists and Agnostics is meeting at 10 a.m. Saturday at 3040 Valleywood Dr. in Kettering.

Author Marya Hornbacher knew she needed help battling her addiction but, as an atheist, Alcoholics Anonymous didn’t seem like the right place for her. Instead of attending a meeting of a secular alternative, though, she went through AA’s program, finding her own ways to get through each step. Her method placed “spirit of life and a deep faith in the value of connecting and sharing with others” above any sort of supernatural deity.  She’s written a book about the experience and it’s called Waiting: A Nonbeliever’s Higher Power.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

To learn more about Alcoholics Anonymous or an alternative contact me, or check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

 

Ruling Could Doom Ohio Stoned Driving Rules

00DUI, Drugs & DrivingTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

stoned driving

Stoned driving laws took a hit this week when Arizona ruled that per se limits on marijuana could not be applied.

Ohio has adopted a draconian impairment law that punishes drivers for having a metabolite of marijuana in their system.  In effect that means that you are stoned driving if you smoke or ingest marijuana the metabolite “hydroxy-THC” that will remain in your body long after the “high” has dissipated.  This means that you may be “impaired” for purposes of the law, but not in any way be impaired by the drug.  If you visit Colorado to legally use recreational marijuana and return to Ohio, you are impaired for up to thirty days thereafter.  This is an absurd and unjust law that gives too much power to law enforcement and enshrines Ohio’s War on Drugs into law.

With states like Colorado legalizing the sale of marijuana, jurisdictions are scrambling to deal with the consequences. Last month, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled 4 to 1 that draconian laws designed to handle driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol could not be applied directly to pot because of the way the drug interacts with the bloodstream.

The high court justices agreed that the statute’s wording was ambiguous and should be interpreted in a way that does not lead to an absurd result, which is what would happen if prosecutors were allowed to implement a zero-tolerance reading of the law. “This interpretation would create criminal liability regardless of how long the metabolite remains in the driver’s system or whether it has any impairing effect,” Justice Robert M. Brutinel wrote for the majority. “For example, at oral argument the state acknowledged that, under its reading of the statute, if a metabolite could be detected five years after ingesting a proscribed drug, a driver who tested positive for trace elements of a non-impairing substance could be prosecuted.”

The court was uncomfortable criminalizing legal conduct, as Arizona voters legalized medical marijuana use in a 2010 referendum. The majority also noted that certain legal drugs can share a metabolite with an illegal drug, which causes a problem with the drugged driving statute that automatically criminalizes the presence of the metabolite in the bloodstream.”Because Section 28-1381(A)(3) does not require the state to prove that a substance discovered in a driver’s body is actually metabolized from a proscribed drug, the state’s interpretation would permit prosecution if the discovered substance is a metabolite of a proscribed drug even if the proscribed drug was never ingested,” Justice Brutinel wrote. “These results are absurd and make the state’s argument untenable.”  The Supreme Court majority declared that the legislature must have meant that any amount of the impairing hydroxy-THC was a criminal act, not the substance that lingers in the bloodstream for thirty days.  Source: Arizona v. Shilgevorkyan (Arizona Supreme Court, 4/22/2014) and www.TheNewspaper.com.

The take-away from this decision is that Ohio needs to legalize marijuana so as to avoid massive injustice.  Ohio can punish stoned driving without making a de facto zero tolerance law that will do nothing but foster disrespect for the law and the people who enforce it.

 

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

To learn about stoned driving contact me, or check these city-specific sites at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville