Posts Tagged ‘Ohio DUI Defense’

A Trial Attorney’s Creed.

June 18th, 2014
trial attorney's creedA Trial Attorney’s Creed!

When someone asks, “How can you defend drunk drivers?” I respond with this quote from Don Quioxte.  I think it is the perfect creed for a trial attorney.

“It is not the responsibility of knights errant to discover whether the afflicted, the enchained and the oppressed whom they encounter on the road are reduced to these circumstances and suffer this distress for their vices, or for their virtues: the knight’s sole responsibility is to succor them as people in need, having eyes only for their sufferings, not for their misdeeds.” 
― Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote

Trial attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio and fighting Ohio red light cameras.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

For more on Trial Attorney Charles Rowland check these city-specific sites at the following links:
FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

Top Ten Rules for Partying in Ohio

March 31st, 2014

In light of the arrest made following the University of Dayton’s victory, we offer college students these rules for partying (legally) in Ohio.

Rule #1: Don’t Drink and Drive

Ohio has some of the most stringent drunk driving laws in the county.  A first-time offender faces 180 days in jail and a one thousand seventy-five dollar fine, loss of their driver’s license for up to three years and enhanced penalties upon subsequent convictions.  A DUI (called an OVI in Ohio) is not subject to expungement, meaning it will be on your record forever, and subjects an offender to a six (6) year look-back period for enhancements and up to twenty (20) years for enhanced punishments for refusing an officer’s request to provide a breath, blood or urine sample.  In addition to the penalties you will face in court, you may face suspension from your school or other discipline. (Ohio Revised Code 4511.19)

Rule #2: Don’t Drink If You Are Under 21

It is illegal in Ohio for anyone under 21 to purchase, possess or consume an alcoholic beverage.  A conviction of Underage Consumption is a first degree misdemeanor and carries a maximum fine of $1,000.00 and/or up to six months in jail.  Despite efforts to lower the drinking age, the law remains rigidly enforced.  Athletes, students on scholarship and students who live in on-campus housing may face additional harsh penalties for underage drinking and be particularly vulnerable to the penalties that are sure to follow an arrest.  Ohio Revised Code Section 4301.69 contains most of the information concerning underage alcohol possession and use. Penalties are in Ohio Revised Code Section 4301.99.

Rule #3: Don’t Furnish Alcohol to Minors

Furnishing someone under 21 with alcohol is a first degree misdemeanor.  If you are providing the alcohol, make sure you know where it is going.  You may be responsible if an underage person consumes the alcohol and face harsh punishments.  Ohio regularly receives funding for programs aimed at curbing underage drinking and uses these funds to go after people providing the booze.  The bigger your party the more likely it is to draw attention from law enforcement.

Rule #4: Don’t Use a Fake ID

Just possessing  a fake ID is illegal in Ohio and is classified as a first degree misdemeanor.  Using the fake ID to purchase alcohol is punished by a mandatory $250.00 fine and may result in a 3 year driver’s license suspension.  A popular enforcement method is for police officers to serve as vendors in drive-through establishments:  “COPS IN SHOPS”

Rule #5: Don’t Drink Where You Shouldn’t

Ohio has an open container law.  It is a minor misdemeanor to possess in public an open container of an alcoholic beverage.  You are subject to a fine of up to $150.00 (a minor misdemeanor).  Possession of alcohol while in a car bumps the charge up to a fourth degree misdemeanor and subjects the offender to 30 days in jail. 4301.62 Opened container of beer or intoxicating liquor prohibited at certain premises.

Rule #6: Don’t Be Drunk In or Near a Car

Pursuant to Ohio Revised Code 4511.194 (effective Jan. 1, 2005), it is illegal to be in physical control of a vehicle while under the influence. “Physical Control” is defined as being in the driver’s seat of a car and having possession of the vehicle’s keys.  Physical Control does not require that the vehicle have ever been driven or even started.  Under the statute, having the keys within reach will satisfy the definition of having “physical control.”   The crime is one of potentiality, (i.e. you are so close to driving that we will punish you) and speaks to the growing neo-prohibitionist tendencies in Ohio law.

Rule #7:  Don’t Be Disorderly

Disorderly conduct can occur from simply being intoxicated in public.  Officers are given a great deal of discretion in determining what constitutes disorderly behavior.  Disorderly conduct occurs when one recklessly causes inconvenience, annoyance or alarm to another due to offensive conduct. Disorderly conduct also occurs when one makes unreasonable noise in such a manner as to violate the peace and quiet of the neighborhood or to be detrimental to the life and health of any individual.  While normally a minor misdemeanor ($150.00 fine) a disorderly conduct can be enhanced to a fourth degree misdemeanor (30 days jail/$250 fine) if an officer tells you to stop the behavior and you persist. See O.R.C. 2917.11 Disorderly Conduct.

Rule #8: Don’t burn stuff

Intentionally setting fire to property that might endanger other or their property, in fact damages the property of another and/or preventing police, fire or EMS personnel from doing their job is a violation of O.R.C. 2909.01 to 2909.0.  Students at public universities in Ohio who are found guilty of these crimes will lose all state-funded financial aid for two years.

Rule #9: Disperse When Instructed

Failure to disperse is also a crime in Ohio.  You should begin walking away and/or go indoors upon such an order. You must obey all lawful orders given by such persons at an emergency site.  A recent revision in the law makes a failure to disperse in situations such as campus area riots an offense for which you can be arrested and jailed. If you actively hamper police officers, firefighters, emergency medical personnel, and other public officials while they are doing their jobs you subject yourself to the charge of Misconduct During An Emergency.

Rule #10 Don’t Riot

The party is getting out of control.  If more than five people are engaging in disorderly behavior the party may be deemed a riot under Ohio law.  Your participation in a riot may subject you to criminal penalties. If there is violence involved the rioting gets bumped up to aggravated rioting.  Aggravated rioting is a felony level offense.  Those found guilty of rioting and aggravated rioting must be dismissed from their university and are not permitted to enroll in any state-supported institution of higher education for one year.

DUI attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in Dayton, Springfield, Kettering, Vandalia, Xenia, Miamisburg, Huber Heights, Beavercreek, and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself the Miami Valley’s choice for DUI defense.  Contact Charles Rowland by phone at 937-318-1DUI (937-318-1384), 937-879-9542, or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263).  For after-hours help contact our 24/7 DUI HOTLINE at 937-776-2671.  For information about Dayton DUI sent directly to your mobile device, text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Twitter @DaytonDUI or Get Twitter updates via SMS by texting DaytonDUI to 40404. DaytonDUI is also available on Facebook, www.facebook.com/daytondui and on the DaytonDUI channel on YouTube.  You can also email Charles Rowland at: CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.comor write to us at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.

Alcohol Is A Central Nervous System Depressant

February 18th, 2014

central nervous system depressantAlcohol is classified as a Central Nervous System Depressant for its effects on the human body.  It is listed as such for purposes of DUI investigations in the 2013 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (hereinafter NHTSA) “DWI Detection and Standardized Field Sobriety Testing” Participant Guide. See NHTSA, HS 178 R5/13.  CNS Depressant type drugs (see below) slow down the operations of the brain, and usually depress the heartbeat, respiration, and many other processes controlled by the brain. The most familiar and ubiquitous Central Nervous System Depressant is alcohol.

Other Depressants of the Central Nervous System include:

• Barbiturates (such as Secobarbital (Seconal), and Pentobarbital (Luminal))
• Non-Barbiturates (GHB-gamma-hydroxybutyrate and Soma)
• Anti-Anxiety Tranquilizers (Such as Valium, Librium, Xanax, and Rohpynol)
• Anti-Depressants (such as Prozac and Elavil)
• Muscle relaxants and many other drugs (Soma)

Depressant drugs usually are taken orally, in the form of pills, capsules, liquids, etc.  In general, people under the influence of any CNS Depressant drugs look and act like people under the influence of alcohol.  General indicators of Central Nervous System Depressant include, but are not limited to the following types of behaviors:

• “Drunken” behavior and appearance
• Uncoordinated
• Drowsy
• Sluggish
• Disoriented
• Thick, slurred speech

Eye indicators of Central Nervous System Depressant influence are:

• Horizontal gaze nystagmus usually will be present
• Vertical nystagmus may be present (with high doses)
• Pupil size usually will not be effected, except that Methaqualone and Soma may cause pupil dilation

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can emailCharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

Central Nervous System Depressant information and other city-specific info at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

Ohio Felony DUI Law: Aggravated Vehicular Homicide

February 13th, 2014

aggravated vehicular homicideThe most tragic cases we handle are cases involving a charge of aggravated vehicular homicide.

Aggravated Vehicular Homicide, O.R.C. 2903.06,  is a crime that results from the death of another caused by the defendant’s operating a vehicle while impaired (a violation of R.C. 4511.19)  or while driving negligently or recklessly.  The aggravated vehicular homicide statute  encompasses driving an automobile recklessly or negligently (called Vehicular homicide) whether or not alcohol played a part in the death.  Often, defendants are indicted for multiple counts, with additional counts for each victim of the accident.

Under the reckless section of the statute you will be found guilty of a third degree felony which rises to a second degree felony if the driver is under suspension at the time of the offense.  Aggravated vehicular homicide, when impaired as defined in R.C. 4511.19, is a second degree felony which rises to a first degree felony if the driver was under suspension at the time of the offense. Penalties include mandatory prison terms with a penalty of up to 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine for the 1st degree felony and prison up to 8 years and a fine up to $15,000 for the 2nd degree felony.  If drunk driving (now called OVI; operating a vehicle while impaired)  has been charged as the proximate cause of the death, the penalties become mandatory and are very difficult to get reduced or lowered.  Often, these cases are high-profile cases engendering much prejudice toward the defendant.

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can emailCharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

Aggravated Vehicular Homicide information and other city-specific info at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

Who Is The Best DUI Attorney?

January 28th, 2014

best dui attorneyAre you the best DUI attorney?

Often a prospective client will ask if I am the “best DUI attorney.”  I always answer this question by saying that I am a damn good DUI attorney, but you should investigate me to determine if I am the best DUI attorney for you.  The most important decision you will make in your case is determining who will represent you.  Here are some things to help you find the best DUI attorney.

How Much Of Your Practice Is Dedicated To DUI Defense?  

DUI defense is a complex area of law involving forensic science, specialized knowledge and litigation techniques specific to DUI.  Successful practitioners will have access to information, arguments, experts and materials that come from being exposed to multiple DUI cases.  DUI attorneys will have blogs, websites, materials, scientific studies, and books specific to the field.  Ask your potential attorney what DUI-specific organizations he belongs to, what legal education conferences he has spoken at or attended. Ask your potential attorney to hand you his or her copy of the NHTSA Student Manual that he will use in court.  Does the attorney have one?  Is it up to date?  Thanks to the internet you can find out all you need to know by looking at other sites that the attorney is featured on.  On www.AVVO.com, attorney profiles have a breakdown of the lawyer’s practice areas that are self-reported by the attorney.  Your search for the best DUI attorney should start with a determination if the attorney does, in fact, practice in the area for which you are seeking representation.

I limit my practice to DUI defense.  100% of my time and energy is devoted to representing the accused drunk driver. 

What Are Your DUI Credentials?

Your search for the best DUI attorney should include a discussion of the attorney’s credentials. Credentials are earned through hard work and dedication to the cause of drunk driving defense.  Often, DUI attorneys receive specialized training and certification on the breath testing machines in their jurisdictions.  These certifications are invaluable in understanding how a machine could malfunction or give a falsely high reading.  Dedicated DUI counsel can also receive specialized training in the Standardized Field Sobriety Testing by becoming certified to administer and evaluate the field tests.  Having worked both sides of the DUI issue can also be an important credential.  Has the attorney ever worked as a prosecuting attorney?  Has the attorney ever prosecuted a DUI case?  Has the attorney ever lectured or written on DUI topics for journals, newspapers or bar associations?  The truth is that the internet has many directories or referral services where an attorney can be listed as a “DUI” attorney with little or no DUI experience whatsoever.  Yellow page advertisements, which often have DUI listed among many other practice areas, can also be misleading as to DUI credentials.  It is up to you to dig deeper and demand that the attorney demonstrate a depth of knowledge in DUI defense.

See the “About Me” section above to learn about my DUI credentials.  I am very proud of my credentials.  I believe myself to be amongst the most qualified and credentialed DUI attorneys in the country.  What is more, I am constantly trying to learn and improve.  You deserve nothing less.

Are You Experienced? Have You Ever Been Experience? Well, I Have

There is no substitute for experience. You should be confident in the knowledge that you have hired someone who has real experience defending DUI cases.  Ask the following and, if you don’t get straight answers, get up and leave: Have you ever tried a DUI case to a jury?  Have you ever tried a felony DUI case?  Have you ever tried a “test” case (a case where the person blew into a breath machine)?  Have you ever tried a “refusal” case (a case where the person refused to blow into a breath test machine)?  Have you ever tried a DUI case in federal court?   Have you ever argued cases involving dentures?  Have you ever argued a case involving AMBIEN sleep medication?  Have you ever represented Doctors? Dentists? Pilots? Paramedics? Athletes? Cops? Other Lawyers? Military Personnel?  How many DUI Motions to Suppress have you done?  Have you ever done a motion or trial in the court where I will appear?

I can answer “YES” to each of these questions.  In addition to my lectures and writings on DUI topics I have testified as an expert witness on evidential breath testing for the United States government.  I am also proud to be the DUI defense attorney brought in to cross-exam police cadets at the Greene County Police Academy mock trial.

Will You Be Representing Me?

If you meet with a highly qualified, experienced and credentialed DUI attorney, make sure that he or she will be the attorney representing you at each stage of the case.  If the attorney says that his firm uses a “team approach” this may  be a way of saying that you will be shuffled off to an associate once you have paid.  Another evasion is for the attorney to say, “all of our attorneys are involved in your case.”  If you hire Michael Jordan make sure you don’t get someone who attended the Michael Jordan basketball camp.  Your case is the most important case in the world to you! You are not a commodity to be managed, but a client to receive the best the attorney has to offer.  When you decide that found the best DUI attorney, make sure that he or she will be the one doing the work.   

At Babb & Rowland, I am the only attorney who handles drunk driving cases.  Barring an emergency I will be at every court appearance and I will be the person providing you information at every stage of your case.

What Do Other People Think Of You?

The legal profession requires a high degree of collaboration and cooperation with others in the legal community.  Often, successful attorneys will be an active member of their local or state bar associations.  Like jury trials, serving on boards, taking on leadership positions and having valuable “real-life” experiences demonstrate that the attorney has the ability to represent your interest.  You can also see your attorney’s rankings and endorsements on www.AVVO.com.  Use this information to inform your opinion.  Also, be sure to meet with the attorney face to face.  There is nothing like sitting down and having a conversation with someone to learn about that person.  Trust your instincts!  If something about the attorney seems off-putting in his office, imagine how nervous you will be when that attorney goes into a room to talk about your life without you there.  The DUI experience is traumatic and you are very vulnerable, so consider bringing someone you trust to interview the attorney with you.

At DaytonDUI we have developed a vibrant online community at www.Facebook.com/daytondui.  Join me to get an idea about my personality and my passion for my clients.  You can also refer to the About Me section of this blog to see that I have a long history of serving the bar, serving in leadership positions and volunteering my time to help others. 

Who Do You Work With?

DUI attorneys often rely on expert witnesses in defending cases, so being the best DUI attorney will mean using the best experts. Experts can prove vital to raising defenses to chemical tests and challenging the officer’s interpretations at the scene.  Experts can include optometrists, accident reconstruction experts, psychologists, private investigators, forensic toxicologists, doctors and forensic scientists.  Experienced DUI counsel will have worked with top-of-the-line experts in court and will know how to use them to your advantage.  Another benefit of hiring experienced counsel rests in knowing when not to rely upon an expert.  Ask for names, and case references and don’t be afraid to demand an interview with the expert prior to hiring them.  Remember the attorney works for you – you don’t work for the attorney.  In my career I have been fortunate enough to work with some truly great experts.  Most often I have relied on experts in the field of forensic toxicology to challenge the evidential chemical tests and I have relied upon former law enforcement officers to challenge the officer’s observations and administration of the standardized field sobriety tests.

I regularly attend the Mastering Science in DUI Seminar through the National College for DUI Defense.  At these seminars I am able to stay on the cutting edge of DUI defense and meet the best expert witnesses in the world. 

How Do You Get Paid And What Do You Cost?

My father always said, “If you know how somebody gets paid you’ll never get ripped off.”  Here are some common-sense questions to determine what you will be charged for:

  • Will you be charged a flat fee or will you pay a retainer fee and have an open-ended bill?
  • Will your attorney be incentivized to keep the case going on longer?
  • Will your attorney be incentivized to take any plea just to end the case?
  • Will you be charged copy fees, filing fees, paralegal fees, or any other fees on top of your bill?
  • Will you be billed monthly, weekly or all at once?
  • Does the fee include the costs of a trial?
  • Does the fee include the costs of an appeal?
  • Does the fee include representation on case-related issues after the case is over (driver’s license issues)?

If the attorney won’t give straight answers to these questions be prepared to leave without hiring that attorney.  If you are shopping based on price alone, you probably won’t hire someone like me.  I am not “cheap” and I don’t want to be.  In my opinion, hiring an attorney based solely on price is as senseless as representing yourself.  Do not expect answers to fee questions over the telephone.  I cannot give you a realistic price unless I know all the information about you and your case.  It is inconceivable to me that a dedicated and ethical attorney could, or would, quote a fee without a thorough investigation of your case.  Asking for a quote over the phone is like asking the question, “what will I pay for a used car?”

So, Are You The Best DUI Attorney? 

This entire post has been giving you ways to determine who is the best DUI attorney for you.  I hope that I have been successful in putting you in a position to decide.  Here are some more common sense points to consider. Do not hire an attorney that promises outcomes or implies that they are the only lawyer who could handle your case.  You know better!  Never hire an attorney who puts down judges, prosecutors or other attorneys.  Confidence is an essential commodity in an attorney, but all that ethical counsel can promise is their best effort at defending you.  Some lawyers, through hard work, may be in a better position to recognize issues in your DUI case.   No lawyer will win all their cases, but you can’t win issues you don’t know exist.  Hire the person who is best situated to be your guide. As the old cowboys used to say, “he’ll do to ride the river with.”  Like all relationships, you will know when it is right. Rely on your judgment and experience and trust your instincts.  You will know whether or not you have found the best DUI attorney. 

Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio and protecting you.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can emailCharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

Ohio DUI law information and other city-specific info at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville