Posts Tagged ‘ovi defense’

DUI Science: Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

August 26th, 2013

pharmacodynamics and pharmacokineticsPharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

Defending a DUI (now called OVI in Ohio) requires an attorney to understand how the body reacts to the impairing substance (pharmacokinetics) and how the brain is affected by the substance (pharmacodynamics).  Pharmacokinetics explains the absorption, distribution and elimination of the drug.  Pharmacodynamics includes the action of the drug on the brain, pharmacologic effects and toxicity. [Holford, N., Chapter 3: Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics: Rational Dosing and the Time Course of Drug Action, in B. Katzung, Editor, McGraw Hill, Eighth Edition, 2001, p. 36].  Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are explained in this short introductory video.

Charles M. Rowland II has attended the National College for DUI Defense intensive “Mastering Science” class in New Orleans and is Ohio’s only Forensic Sobriety Assessment certified attorney.  He uses science to help win your DUI case.  DUI Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can emailCharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

 Find city-specific Ohio DUI information about teachers and OVI in specific cities, please follow these links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

Marked Lane Violation Overturned By Third District Court of Appeals

August 21st, 2013

State v. Shaffer, 2013-Ohio-3581 Overturns Marked Lane Violation

marked lane violation

In a decision that will impact many OVI cases, the Third District Court of Appeals ruled that a trooper did not have a “reasonable, articulable” suspicion to stop a Paulding County woman for a marked lanes violation. O.R.C. 4511.33.   Accordingly, her convictions for reckless operation and failure to drive within the marked lanes were reversed.

In the court’s unanimous decision, authored by Judge Stephen R. Shaw, the court agreed with Shaffer’s claims “that Trooper Sisco’s testimony that a vehicle’s tires touched the white fog line on a single occasion, causing the right fender of the vehicle to extend slightly over the line for three seconds, without any other evidence in the record addressing either the practicability or safety of the circumstances, is not sufficient to establish reasonable, articulable suspicion of a marked lane violation of R.C. 4511.33(A)(1).”

Judge Shaw particularly pointed to one specific phrase in section (A)(1).

“We believe the language ‘as nearly as is practicable’ inherently contemplates some inevitable and incidental touching of the lane lines by a motorist’s vehicle during routine and lawful driving, without the vehicle being considered to have left the lane of travel so as to constitute a marked lanes violation,” Judge Shaw wrote.

“Accordingly, it is our conclusion that consideration of the statutory factors of practicability and safety is integral to any determination of a violation of R.C. 4511.33(A)(1).”

“The fact remains that in this case there is no evidence in the record from which any legitimate inference can be drawn regarding either one of these requisite statutory elements,” Judge Shaw noted.

“Accordingly without some additional evidence in the record regarding the surrounding circumstances, traffic and road conditions going to the express statutory language regarding either practicability or safety, we cannot conclude that the act of Shaffer driving onto the white fog line one time for a matter of three seconds is alone sufficient to establish the requisite reasonable and articulable suspicion to stop Shaffer for a violation of R.C. 4511.33(A)(1).”

In conclusion, Judge Shaw wrote: “We simply believe our decision is more consistent with the specific statutory language of R.C. 4511.33(A)(1), which among other things, refers to the movement and location of vehicles, not tires.”  For a link to the Marked Lane Violation statute, please visit this link [HERE].

 

Ohio DUI Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can emailCharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

 

 Find city-specific Ohio DUI information on Marked Lane Violation in specific cities, please follow these links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville 

 

Community Control (Probation) in an OVI Case

August 8th, 2013

barbed wireIf you are charged with a DUI (now called OVI; operating a vehicle impaired) chances are you will be placed on probation at the disposition of your case.

Probation is now called “community control” and provides for terms and conditions you must comply with in order not to go to jail.  Probation requires you to work with a “probation officer” (P.O.) for a given period of time as set by the court.  A common misconception is that the probation officer will actively work against you in an effort to return you to jail.  Most of the time, the probation officer is working to make sure you comply with the court order and stay out of jail.  It is up to you to show up and make sure the probation officer is kept aware of your circumstances.  You should maintain contact with your trial attorney as may problems can be solved if there is good communication.  Most experienced attorneys can advise you about how to navigate the courts probation department and successfully complete probation. Under Ohio law, you cannot demand to serve jail time instead of being placed on community control in misdemeanor OVI cases, see State v. Walton (2000), 137 Ohio App. 3d 450, 457 — “…(A) misdemeanor offender has no right to refuse probation and to demand to serve her sentence of imprisonment.” Unlicensed driver was headed to prison for eight months and wanted six month traffic sentence served concurrently. Instead, the judge put her on probation.

 

Often, a court will only keep you on probation until you have paid all fines and costs and complied with the requirements of your punishments.  In DUI/OVI cases, the probation department is responsible for setting up the 72 hour Driver Intervention Program and will make sure you attend and complete the program.  Work with your Ohio DUI attorney to learn about how to comply with the terms and conditions of probation (now called “Community Control Sanctions”).  Depending on the court, you may face any or all of the following probationary conditions: No new DUI or serious traffic arrests; Alcohol Assessment and/or Follow Up Alcohol Counseling; Random Urine Screens; Restrictions on driving times; No “Refusals” of blood, breath, or urine tests if arrested for DUI; No odor of alcohol while driving a vehicle; Pay fines and court costs; Attend MADD’s Victim Impact Panel; Attend probation officer meetings; Install Ignition Interlock (breath tester in the vehicle); Continuous Alcohol Monitor (ankle bracelet); Restrictions on travel outside of Ohio or the county; Electronic Home Monitoring or House Arrest; Work-Release or Community Service.  As you can see, the probation department and your probation officer have a great deal of power over your life while you are on community control.  Your DUI attorney should be a continued resource available to help you with issues that arise while on community control.

 

If you have been arrested for violating probation, you will have a hearing in front of  the judge. Since you have already been sentenced to probation for committing a crime, you will not be entitled to a jury to determine whether or not you have violated the terms of your probation.  The sentencing judge will hear the facts of your alleged violation, and determine if you did in fact violate any of the terms or conditions. A probation violation is not like a new criminal charge, you can be forced to testify against yourself and witness testimony can be used against you.  In most courts violations of the terms of your probation are very serious matters.  Unlike criminal matters, prosecutors are not bound by the “beyond a reasonable doubt standard.  Under Ohio law, prosecutors need only show that there exists a “preponderance of the evidence” that a violation has occurred, which means they only have to prove that it is more likely than not that you violated probation.  You should be aware of the terms and ask questions if you have any confusion.  A violation of technical terms (such as changing your address without informing the court, failing to pay on time and not showing up for your probation appointment) are as serious as the violation of a more substantive term.  Being charged with a new crime can result in a revocation of probation even if you are not convicted due to the lower preponderance of the evidence standard.  You could not only face jail time on the new charge, but face the time previously suspended from your earlier offense.  The charges need not be in the same court to invoke the court’s community control jurisdiction.

DUI attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in DaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburg, Huber Heights,Beavercreek, and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself the Miami Valley’s choice for DUI defense.  Contact Charles Rowland by phone at 937-318-1DUI (937-318-1384), 937-879-9542, or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263).  For after-hours help contact our 24/7 DUI HOTLINE at 937-776-2671.  For information about Dayton DUI sent directly to your mobile device, text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Twitter @DaytonDUI or Get Twitter updates via SMS by texting DaytonDUI to 40404. DaytonDUI is also available on Facebook,www.facebook.com/daytondui and on the DaytonDUI channel on YouTube.  You can also email Charles Rowland at: CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.comor write to us at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.

 

 

 

Ohio OVI Law: Impairment by Drugs

March 29th, 2013

Ohio is making the transition to using the Drug Recognition Expert protocol in apprehending and prosecuting impaired drivers.   DRE refers not only to the officers themselves, but to the 12-step procedure that these officers use. DRE was developed by police officers from the Los Angeles (California) Police Department. In 1979, the Drug Recognition program received the official recognition of the LAPD.  On October 22, 2010, Ohio became the 48th state to be accepted into the International Association of Chiefs of Police’s (IACP) Drug Evaluation and Classification Program (DECP).

Once approved by the IACP’s DECP Highway Safety Committee, Ohio was eligible to provide the DRE training.  Ohio graduated their first DRE class in October, 2011.  “I am pleased this training is being offered to our law enforcement partners,” said Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS) Executive Director Karhlton Moore. “This will be an invaluable resource in our fight to curb impaired driving, as well as focus on emerging issues such as the prescription drug epidemic currently affecting so many communities across Ohio.” [Source]  In July, I spoke with Sgt. Wes Stought of the Ohio State Highway Patrol who oversees the Ohio DRE program at the Ohio Municipal Attorneys Association.  He states that the program is moving forward with a goal of full implementation in every county.

The DRE program is a traffic-safety program that focuses on the detection, apprehension and adjudication of drug-impaired drivers. A DRE is a police officer who is trained to recognize impairment in drivers under the influence of drugs or a combination of drugs and alcohol. A DRE undergoes specialized training in detecting and identifying the category or categories of drugs causing the impairment. The process is based on observable signs and symptoms that are known to be reliable indicators of drug impairment.

12 Steps of the Drug Evaluation Process

  1. Breath Alcohol Test – A sample of breath is taken from the test subject to determine the concentration of alcohol, if any, in the test subject.
  2. Interview of Arresting Officer – The DRE consults with the investigator(s) to determine the circumstances leading up to the apprehension of the test subject.
  3. Preliminary Examination – Initial examination of the subject. Some questions are asked in relation to the subject’s medical/physical limitations.
  4. Eye Examination – Eyes are examined for pupils being equal, the ability of the eyes to track a stimulus equally, to monitor the smoothness of that tracking, to look for Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus, as well as Vertical Gaze Nystagmus.
  5. Divided Attention Tests – One Leg Stand is done with both legs. Walk and Turn test is done. Modified Romberg Balance test. And Finger to Nose test is done.
  6. Examination of Vital Signs – Blood pressure, pulse and body temperature is taken.
  7. Dark Room Examinations – Examination of the pupil sizes in near total darkness, under direct light, and in normal room light. Examination of the oral and nasal cavities are done at the same time.
  8. Examination of Muscle Tone – Flexion and Extension of the muscles are tested, to see if there is flaccidity, or rigidity of the muscles.
  9. Examination of Injection Sites – Examination of common injection sites to determine if the subject is using injected substances.
  10. Suspects Statements / Other Observations – Soliciting information from the test subject which will corroborate signs and symptoms that the evaluator has observed.
  11. Opinion of the Evaluator – The DRE makes a determination of the class or classes of drugs that a subject is under the influence based on a matrix of symptomology that has been developed during studies of subjects under the influence of known classes of drugs.
  12. The Toxicological Examination – Blood, saliva or urine is obtained by demand, which is analyzed to determine what class of substances are present that corroborates the DRE’s opinion.

7 Drug Categories

  1. Central Nervous System Depressants
  2. Inhalants
  3. Dissociative Anesthetics
  4. Cannabis
  5. Central Nervous System Stimulants
  6. Hallucinogens
  7. Narcotic Analgesics

DUI attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver.  He regularly appears in courts in courts in FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboroHuber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself the Miami Valley’s choice for DUI defense.  Contact Charles Rowland by phone at 937-318-1DUI (937-318-1384), 937-879-9542, or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263).  For after-hours help contact our 24/7 DUI HOTLINE at 937-776-2671.  For information about Dayton DUI sent directly to your mobile device, text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Twitter @DaytonDUI or Get Twitter updates via SMS by texting DaytonDUI to40404. DaytonDUI is also available on Facebook and on the DaytonDUI channel on YouTube.  You can also email Charles Rowland at: CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or write to us at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324. “All I do is DUI Defense

Field Sobriety Tests: Can They Be Thrown Out in Court?

March 27th, 2013

QUESTION: If you get a field sobriety test (or blood test or urine test, etc), can the tests be thrown out in court?

AUDIO ANSWER by DUI Attorney Charles Rowland: