Posts Tagged ‘underage consumption’

Ohio DUI Laws: An Overview

August 12th, 2013

ohio dui lawsThis post collects together in one place many of the Ohio DUI Laws that arise in drunk driving cases.  

Some Ohio DUI laws are listed because law enforcement will charge these offenses to establish probable cause for pulling over your vehicle.  If you need to find out more about a specific law, or how the statute has been interpreted or applied, call Charles M. Rowland II at (937) 318-1384 or read about the specific Ohio DUI law at the Ohio DUI Law Blog.

Operating a Vehicle Impaired (OVI); O.R.C. 4511.19

This is Ohio’s drunk driving statute (Ohio’s DUI law).  It is a complex and constantly changing statute that encompasses impaired driving by having a prohibited concentration of alcohol or drugs as well as the charge of driving impaired based on no test or a defendant’s refusal to take a chemical test.  The statue has been expanded to include both high-tier and low-tier OVI charges as well as setting the under 21 prohibited concentration.  Ohio DUI laws are complex and require the assistance of an experienced Ohio DUI attorney.

Aggravated Vehicular Homicide; O.R.C. 2903.06

Ohio DUI Laws: Aggravated Vehicular Homicide is a crime that results from the death of another caused by the defendant’soperating a vehicle while impaired (a violation of R.C. 4511.19)  or while driving negligently or recklessly.  The statute  encompasses driving an automobile recklessly or negligently (called Vehicular homicide) whether or not alcohol played a part in the death.

Aggravated Vehicular Assault; O.R.C. 2903.08

Ohio DUI Laws: Aggravated Vehicular Assault is the crime of causing serious physical harm to a person while violating Ohio’s drunk driving statute.

Operating A Vehicle After Underage Consumption (OVUAC); O.R.C. 4511.19(B)

Ohio DUI Laws: O.R.C. 4511.19(B) makes it illegal for persons under 21 years of age to drive a vehicle with a concentration of .02 percent, but less than .08 percent by weight of alcohol by whole blood or breath, or with an equivalent amount by blood serum or plasma or urine.  (1994 S.B. 82, eff. 5/4/94).

Having Physical Control of a Vehicle While Under the Influence (Physical Control); O.R.C. 4511.194

Ohio DUI Laws: The crime of “Physical Control” involves being in physical control of a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or a drug of abuse.  This definition means that you do not have to be driving or operating the car.

Reckless Operation; O.R.C. 4511.20

Reckless operation in Ohio can constitute any number of offenses within the Ohio Revised Code dealing with operation of a vehicle with willful or wanton disregard to persons or property. It can be charged as a 3rd degree misdemeanor, a 4th degree misdemeanor or as a minor misdemeanor under Ohio law.

Boating Under the Influence (BUI); O.R.C. 1547.11

Penalties for Boating Under the Influence offenses are set forth at O.R.C. 1547.99 and are similar to those provided for DUI/OVI offenses.  Boating Under the Influence is a first degree misdemeanor and is subject to a minimum 3-day jail sentence and a maximum 6 months in jail.  The 3-day jail sentence can be served in a qualified driver intervention program.  The minimum mandatory fine for a first BUI offense is $150.  The language of the statute is broad, including control of any vessel underway or shall manipulate any water skis, aquaplane, or similar device on Ohio waterways.

Driving in Marked Lanes (Marked Lanes); O.R.C. 4511.33

A marked lanes charge is often a companion charge to a DUI/OVI offense.  It is also a “cue” that the officer may look for based on his/her National Highway Transportation Safety Administration training.

Lanes of travel upon roadways of sufficient width; O.R.C. 4511.25

Going the wrong way on a designated roadway or traveling into the “other” lane may be a violation of the “Lanes of Travel” law.  Some experienced officers choose to charge this offense rather than a Marked Lanes violation or charge this in combination with a Marked Lanes violation.

Turn and Stop Signals; O.R.C. 4511.39

“No person shall turn a vehicle… or move right or left upon a highway unless and until such person has exercised due care to ascertain that the movement can be made with reasonable safety nor without giving an appropriate signal in the manner hereinafter provided. When required, a signal of intention to turn or move right or left shall be given continuously during not less than the last one hundred feet traveled by the vehicle… before turning.”

Underage Consumption or Possession; O.R.C. 4301.69

This statue encompasses the crime of possessing and furnishing alcohol to minors.  If you are under 21 years old, drinking alcohol is illegal in the State of Ohio.  Ohio Revised Code 4301.69(E)(1) provides that “No underage person shall knowingly order, pay for, share the cost of, attempt to purchase, possess, or consume any beer or intoxicating liquor in any public or private place. No underage person shall knowingly be under the influence of any beer or intoxicating liquor in any public place.”  As a parent, you cannot give alcohol to your teen’s friends under the age of 21, under any circumstance, even in your own home, even with their parent’s permission.

Speeding and Assured Clear Distance, Following Too Closely; O.R.C. 4511.21

The speed law is set forth at Ohio Revised Code 4511.21.  It states:(A) No person shall operate a motor vehicle, trackless trolley, or streetcar at a speed greater or less than is reasonable or proper, having due regard to the traffic, surface, and width of the street or highway and any other conditions, and no person shall drive any motor vehicle, trackless trolley, or streetcar in and upon any street or highway at a greater speed than will permit the person to bring it to a stop within the assured clear distance ahead.  The law goes on to set forth the “speed limits” or presumed speed limits.  According to the Ohio State Highway Patrol, there were more than 65,500 crashes statewide last year because of drivers following too closely. And of those crashes, 58 died and 18,552 were injured.

License Plate Light Not Illuminated, O.R.C. 4513.05

In Ohio, it is illegal to operate a motor vehicle without a white light illuminating the rear registration plate. See O.R.C. 4513.05.  This law is often used as a pretext for a traffic stop which allows the officer to come into contact with the motorist. This is among the more “ticky-tack” reasons to pull someone over and the public views this as something of an underhanded trick used by law enforcement to justify a stop.

Driving Under SuspensionO.R.C.4510.14

Driving under an OVI suspension is a violation of Ohio Revised Code 4510.14.  It is a separate offense from a DUI/OVI charge and carries harsh mandatory penalties. With the use of “party plates” which stigmatize people convicted of DUI and their innocent family members, and the increased use of computer license plate readers, Ohioans are seeing an increase in the number of people being ticketed for driving under suspension.

Ohio DUI/OVI Attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

 

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville 

DUI In Xenia, Beavercreek or Fairborn? An Overview of Greene County Courts

September 24th, 2012

If you are arrested for DUI/OVI in Greene County, Ohio you will appear in one of the following courts.

  • Greene County Court of Common Pleas: The Greene County Court of Common Pleas is located at 45 N. Detroit St., Xenia, Ohio 45385 in the historic Greene County Courthouse.  The Court is responsible for felony level offenses (including felony level OVI offenses, Aggravated Vehicular Homicide and Aggravated Vehicular Assault cases) arising in Greene County, Ohio.  The Greene County Court of Common Pleas is presided over by the Honorable Stephen A. Wolaver (937) 562-5218, and the Honorable Michael A. Buckwalter (937) 562-5217. For information about a specific Greene County Common Pleas case, contact the Clerk of Courts at (937) 562-5290.  Greene County maintain two jail facilities, the Greene County Jail located at 77 East Market Street, Xenia, Ohio 45385, (937) 562-4840 and the Greene County Adult Detention Center, 2295 Greeneway Blvd., Xenia, Ohio 45385, (937) 562-5840.
  • O.V.U.A.C. (Operating a vehicle after underage consumption) and Juvenile OVI offenses are heard in the Greene County Juvenile Court, 2100 Greeneway Blvd., Xenia, Ohio 45385, (937) 562-4000.  The judge of the Greene County Juvenile Court is the Honorable Robert H. Hutcheson.  The Juvenile Detention Center is part of the Greene County Juvenile Court Complex, the west wing of the building, located at 2100 Greene Way Blvd., Xenia, Ohio  45385.
  • The Fairborn Municipal Court, located at at 1148 Kauffman Ave., Fairborn, Ohio 45324, maintains a copy of its fee schedule on its web site. The Fairborn Municipal Court serves Fairborn, Bath TownshipBeavercreek and Beavercreek Township. The court conducts preliminary hearings in felony cases, handles traffic and non-traffic misdemeanors, and civil cases where the money in dispute does not exceed $15,000. The Greene County Common Pleas Court (Xenia) handles felony criminal cases.  You can contact the Fairborn Municipal Court at; (937) 754-3040 or by fax at  (937) 879-4422.  The presiding Judge of the Fairborn Municipal Court is Beth W. Root who became judge of the Fairborn/Beavercreek Municipal Court in January 2008.Fairborn/Beavercreek Municipal Court.
  • The Xenia Municipal Court is located on the second floor of Xenia City Hall, 101 N. Detroit Street. The XMC Probation Department is located at 64 E. Main St.Xenia Municipal Court.  Hours are 7:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays & Wednesdays.  Hours are 7:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays.  You can contact the Xenia Municipal Court at (937) 376-7290.  The Xenia Municipal Court has jurisdiction for the cities of Xenia and Bellbrook; the villages of Yellow Springs, Cedarville, Jamestown, Spring Valley, and Bowersville; and the townships of Sugarcreek, Xenia, Cedarville, New Jasper, Silvercreek, Ceasarcreek, Miami, Jefferson, Ross, and Spring Valley. The Court’s jurisdiction also includes four college campuses: Central State University, Wilberforce University, Cedarville College, and Antioch College.  Law enforcement agencies located within the jurisdiction of the court include: Bellbrook Police Department; Cedarville Police Department; Central State University Police Department; Greene County Animal Control; Greene County Sheriff’s Office; Greene County Parks District; Jamestown Police Department; Ohio Department of Parks and Natural Resources; Ohio Department of Wildlife; Ohio State Highway Patrol; Sugarcreek Township Police Department; Wilberforce University Police Department; Xenia Police Division; and Yellow Springs Police Department.
  • The Yellow Springs Mayor’s Court hears misdemeanor offenses that occur in the jurisdiction of the Yellow Springs Police Department.  The Yellow Springs Mayor’s Court is held in the Byron Community Center, located at 100 Dayton Street just adjacent to downtown Yellow Springs.  The Byron Community Center also houses the Yellow Springs Police Department, which can be reached at: Non-Emergency: (937) 767-7206 or at dispatch@yso.com. For inquiries regarding court appearances, fine and costs amounts, court procedures and other court matters, you may call the Clerk of Court’s office at (937) 767-3400.  If you wish, you may remove your case from the Yellow Springs Mayor’s Court to the jurisdiction of the Xenia Municipal Court located at 101 N. Detroit St., Xenia, Ohio.  Removal is a decision that should be made only after a complete consultation with an attorney familiar with the Yellow Springs Mayor’s Court and the Xenia Municipal Court.

Contact Charles Rowland by phone at 937-318-1DUI (937-318-1384), 937-879-9542, or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (1-888-769-5263).  For after-hours help contact our 24/7 DUI HOTLINE at 937-776-2671.  Immediate help is available by filling out the CONTACT form on any of these pages.  For information about Dayton DUI sent directly to your mobile device, text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/DaytonDUI or Get Twitterupdates via SMS by texting follow DaytonDUI to 40404. DaytonDUI is also available on Facebook and you can access updates by becoming a fan of Dayton DUI/OVI Defense.  You can also email Charles Rowland at: CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or write to us at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.

Ohio Drunk Driving Law and the College Student

August 27th, 2012

If you get a DUI while attending an Ohio college or university the effects can be devastating.  It is vital that you speak to an attorney prior to making any legal decision that can affect your future.  Too many frightened and overwhelmed students choose to just plead guilty not knowing the life-long consequences their actions can have.

In a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) survey, 44% of college students reported binge drinking at least once in the two weeks prior to being surveyed.  19% reported frequent binge drinking, and more than half of those admitted to drinking and driving in the 30 days prior to being surveyed. It is not surprising that college students are arrested for DUI in high numbers.  Charles M. Rowland II has helped college students in and around Dayton since 1995.  His experience includes representing students before Judicial Conduct Boards, and having full hearings before institutional investigative bodies.  He as also served as an adjunct professor for the Wright State University Honors Program and as a city prosecuting attorney in Greene County and has represneted students from most, if not all, of the local colleges and universities.  He can help you inside and outside the courtroom to achieve a fair resolution to your case. When the stakes are this high, it is important to discuss your options with a criminal defense lawyer who is experienced in representing college and university students.

On Campus Punishment. All colleges and university take alcohol and drug issues seriously.  If your school chooses to inject itself in your criminal case, the institutional punishment that you will face is spelled out in your Student Code of Conduct.  The decision to take action can depend on factors such as:

  • your previous history with the police,
  • your previous history of institutional infractions
  • the location of your offense (on-campuse or off?),
  • any publicity surrounding your case,
  • your age (did you obtain the alcohol legally?),
  • what major or program you are involved in,
  • whether you are a student-athlete,
  • whether you are involved in a fraternity/sorority,
  • whether you are a “scholarship” student,
  • a prior history of alcohol problems on campus,
  • any property damage,
  • how bad you make the school look to the larger community,
  • injuries to you or others;  and
  • the severity of the impact on the college community

If you have a federal scholarship and you are convicted of ANY drug offense, including a State misdemeanor marijuana charge, you will lose your scholarship for at least one year, and you could lose it permanently. Early reinstatement is possible if certain criteria are satisfied.  Begin your research by looking at your Student Code of Conduct.  Listed below are links to the Student Codes of Conduct of many of the Miami Valley Colleges and Universities

Institutional penalties for drug and/or alcohol offenses may  include: loss of scholarships and federal financial aid; loss of student housing; loss of college-related privileges (attending campus events, library use, etc.; temporary and/or permanent suspension), and you may be put on a probationary period.  The worst offenses may result in permanent expulsion from the school.  Some of these punishments may be levied even if the case does not result in a conviction for DUI.  Some schools show a great deal of leniency and understanding, others are notorious for harsh reactions. Charles is familiar with the special circumstances surrounding a DUI arrest in college.  He knows how awful it is to inform your parents that you were arrested and will work hard to educate and empower you and your family about your case.  He can help with issues caused by family being far away.  He can help get you driving privileges.  He will tell you about costs in a fair and up-front manner.  He will spell out your options about obtaining a “free attorney” either through the local Public Defender’s Office or via your campus pre-paid legal program.  Charles, and the entire staff of DaytonDUI will make you a priority.

Underage Consumption. Underage possession or consumption of beer or intoxicants is a serious crime in Ohio.  The charges are first-degree misdemeanors carrying a maximum penalty of 180 days in jail and up to a $1,000.00 fine.  Worse yet, a conviction may leave you with a “criminal record” which is much more serious than a fine or costs.  Fear, shame or guilt may compel you to want to plead guilty to put the charge behind you, but that decision may have long-lasting and unintended consequences.  If you are under 21 years old, drinking alcohol is illegal in the State of Ohio.  Ohio Revised Code 4301.69(E)(1) provides that “No underage person shall knowingly order, pay for, share the cost of, attempt to purchase, possess, or consume any beer or intoxicating liquor in any public or private place. No underage person shall knowingly be under the influence of any beer or intoxicating liquor in any public place.”

The same section provides for three recognized exceptions to the law, they are set forth below:

  1. If the person is in the “presence of their parent, legal guardian or spouse who is over 21 years old;”
  2. If the alcohol is consumed as part of a recognized religious service; and
  3. If the alcohol is prescribed for medical treatment.

Section 4301.69(E)(2), sets forth a diversion program for underage offenders.  It states, “[i]f the child completes the diversion program to the satisfaction of the court, the court shall dismiss the complaint and order the child’s record in the case sealed under sections 2151.356 to 2151.358 of the Revised Code. If the child fails to satisfactorily complete the diversion program, the court shall proceed with the complaint.”  A child is ineligible for diversion if he or she has previously been diverted.  O.R.C 4301.69(A)-(C) also contain harsh penalties for furnishing alcohol to minors or providing them accommodations in which the “owner or occupant” allows a person to remain while the person is possessing or consuming alcohol.  Many times police will target the owner of a home, apartment or dorm room wherein minors are drinking.  If you are under 18 at the time of your arrest, your case will be prosecuted in the Juvenile Court.  Person under 21, but older than 18 will have their cases heard in the Municipal Court.  Often, resolving the matter in court is not the end of the process.  Most university students face a disciplinary hearing before a university review board or student government panel.

Long-term Ramifications. In addition to dealing with any penalties you may face in school, you have to be mindful of the long-term impact of a DUI conviction.  Most employers now routinely do a background check on candidates.  The job market is increasingly competitive and having a DUI on your record may be the difference in beginning your career or being unemployed.  If the career you are pursuing requires obtaining a professional license, it is even more important to fight your charge. Whether you are pursuing a career in medicine, law, nursing accounting or another profession, the licensing board will scrutinize your criminal record before granting you licensure.  Dayton, being a hub of the aerospace and defense industries, has a large number of employers who will require that applicants be eligible for high level security clearances.  Other jobs may require you to obtain fleet insurance, drive a company car or secure a commercial driver’s license.  A DUI can be a major obstacle.  Parents sometimes tell us that their children should pay the price if they are arrested for drunk driving while at college. Often parents do not realize how steep that price can be.

DUI attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in DaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboroHuber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself the Miami Valley’s choice for DUI defense.  Contact Charles Rowland by phone at 937-318-1DUI (937-318-1384), 937-879-9542, or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263).  For after-hours help contact our 24/7 DUI HOTLINE at 937-776-2671.  For information about Dayton DUI sent directly to your mobile device, text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Twitter @DaytonDUI or Get Twitter updates via SMS by texting DaytonDUI to 40404. DaytonDUI is also available on Facebook and on the DaytonDUI channel on YouTube.  You can also email Charles Rowland at: CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or write to us at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324. “All I do is DUI”

Alcohol and Energy Drinks (by DaytonDUI.com)

August 23rd, 2012

One 23.5 ounce can of the Four Loko alcoholic ...

In 2005, the Drink Four  Brewing Company introduced Four Loko to the American malt beverage market. The name “Four” is derived from the original energy drink’s four main ingredients: alcoholcaffeinetaurine, and guarana.  There are three product lines within the Four brand:

  • Four Loko — contains either 6%, 8%, or 12% alcohol by volume (ABV), depending on state regulations, and is packaged in 23.5 oz. cans
  • Poco Loko — contains 8% alcohol by volume (ABV), and is packaged in 16 oz. cans
  • Four Loko in bottles — contains either 6% or 8% alcohol by volume (ABV), and is packaged in 11.2 oz. glass bottles

Original formulations of both beverages were a malt liquor-based, caffeinated alcoholic energy drink with added guarana and taurine. The formulations were developed by three alumni of The Ohio State University: Chris Hunter, Jeff Wright, and Jaisen Freeman.  Almost immediately following the introduction of the drinks, a coalition formed in opposition to the beverage.  Critics suggested that consuming energy drinks with alcohol can be harmful in reducing the perception of alcohol intoxication and/or in leading to increased alcohol or drug consumption.

In 2009, a group of US state attorneys general began active investigations of companies which produced and sold caffeinated alcohol beverages, on the grounds that they were being inappropriately marketed to a teenage audience.  The attorneys general were also concerned that these drinks could pose health risks by masking feelings of intoxication.  Colleges and universities joined the chorus against the beverages in 2010 when they began to see injuries and blackouts related to the drink’s use.  The University of Rhode Island banned this product from their campus on November 5, 2010. [sourced via Wikipedia].  Several stores, including Tops Markets, Price Chopper and Wegmans have voluntarily pulled the product from their shelves.

Under mounting pressure, Phusion withdrew Four Loko from the State of New York in November, 2009.  The beverage was banned in Oregon by a 4-1 vote of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission in that same month.  Citing health and safety concerns, Oklahoma joined the movement against the sale of Four Loko.  Michigan soon followed suit.  Id.  According to a statement from the Michigan Liquor Control Commission, “The decision was made in light of several studies regarding alcohol energy drinks, the widespread community concerns aired by substance abuse prevention groups, parent groups and various members of the public, as well as the FDA’s decision to further investigate these products.” [source]  The New York State Liquor Authority moved for a full  ban as of November 19, 2010. New York state senator Chuck Schumer and New York City councilman James Sanders Jr. have approached the Obama administration to ban Four Loko across the state of New York.  Ohio did not join the stampede.  Instead, they took a wait and see approach.  “We are continuing to monitor the situation,” a representative of the Ohio Department of Commerce Division of Liquor Control said. “However, a legislative change would be needed to the statute in order for the superintendent to disapprove a product.” [source]

On November 17, 2010 the U.S. FDA Food and Drug Administration dropped the proverbial hammer.  They issued a warning letter to four manufacturers of caffeinated alcohol beverages citing that the caffeine added to their malt alcoholic beverages is an “unsafe food additive” and said that further action, including seizure of their products, may occur under federal law.  It declared that beverages that combine caffeine with alcohol, such as Four energy drinks, are a “public health concern” and can’t stay on the market in their current form.  But is this drink really a public menace?

As reported at Alcohol Problem and Solution, a site maintained by Dr. David J. Hanson of the State University of New York, the research does not support the level of outrage generated by the public.  To examine the scientific evidence on the effects of mixing energy drinks and alcohol, a review of the research was conducted. It found

  • virtually no evidence that energy drinks influence any behavioral effects of alcohol,
  • no reliable evidence that energy drinks effect the perceived level of intoxication by drinkers,
  • no evidence that mixing energy drinks and alcohol leads to alcohol or drug abuse or dependence, and
  • no adverse health effects for healthy individuals from combining energy drinks and alcohol.

The review was conducted by researchers at the Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences at Utrect University, Utrecht, The Netherlands, and published in the International Journal of General Medicine.  If you wish to review the research, please consult the following:

  • Greenemeier, L. Why Are Caffeinated Alcoholic Energy Drinks Dangerous? Scientific American, November 9, 2010.
  • Hendrick, B. Dangerous Cocktail: Energy Drinks + Alcohol: Mixing Booze With Energy Drinks Triples Risk of Getting Drunk. WebMD Health News, February 12, 2010.
  • Join Together Staff. Combining Energy Drubks with Alcohol More Dangerous than Drinking Alcohol Alone. JoinTogetherOnline.com, April 18, 2011.
  • Jones, S.C., et al. Why (not) alcohol energy drinks? A qualitative study with Australian university students. Drug and Alcohol Review, published online May 24, 2011. DOI: 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2011.00319.x
  • Minderhout, C. Energy Drinks and Alcohol Still a Risky Mix. Food Safety News, May 2, 2011.
  • Park, A. A Bad Mix: Why Alcohol and Energy Drinks Are Dangerous:
    Healthland Time, April 18, 2011.

DUI attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver in DaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboroHuber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself the Miami Valley’s choice for DUI defense.  Contact Charles Rowland by phone at 937-318-1DUI (937-318-1384), 937-879-9542, or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263).  For after-hours help contact our 24/7 DUI HOTLINE at 937-776-2671.  For information about Dayton DUI sent directly to your mobile device, text DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Twitter @DaytonDUI or Get Twitter updates via SMS by texting DaytonDUI to 40404. DaytonDUI is also available on Facebook and on the DaytonDUI channel on YouTube.  You can also email Charles Rowland at: CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or write to us at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324. “All I do is DUI”

Consequences of a Fake ID

December 10th, 2011

Fake IDs Have Real Consequences

Seal of the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles Source

If you are under the age of 21 years of age and you either (a) use someone else’s identification to buy alcohol, or (b) alter your identification to purchase alcohol, you will find yourself facing a multiplicity of consequences.  O.R.C. 4510.33 carries a one year license suspension.  You will be required to retake the driver’s license examination if the license is altered.  You will also be required to pay a reinstatement fee to the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles.  You can file an appeal within 20 days of the mailing of the notice in the municipal or county court, or if under the age of 18 years, in the juvenile court in whose jurisdiction such person resides. You must agree to pay the cost of the proceedings and allege error by the Registrar of Motor Vehicles in the suspension of the license or in one or more of the matters within the scope of the hearing.  For more information on a Violation of Liquor Law, visit the Ohio BMV HERE.

A serious offense requires a serious attorney.  I have been fighting driving under suspension charges for over sixteen years. By fighting hard in the courtroom and negotiating intelligently outside of it, we work to avoid a conviction or mitigate the worst provisions of this charge.  Check me out by clicking on the “About Me” section of this blog and contact me at (937) 318-1384. I practice in Dayton, Springfield, Xenia, Miamisburg, Beavercreek, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Fairborn and I appear in all courts throughout the Miami Valley.